Lecture 14 Feb 20 2008 Coal

Lecture 14 Feb 20 2008 Coal - A human being consumes...

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A human being consumes natural resources throughout life.
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Resources are fundamentally important to human life. We might classify them as Essential Resources soil and water Energy oil, gas, coal, uranium, oil shale, geothermal Metals iron, aluminum, copper, gold, silver, chromium, lead . ... Industrial Minerals fertilizers, salt, sand, gravel, gypsum, limestone ….
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The plants that formed coal and oil captured energy from the sun through photosynthesis to create the compounds (biomass) that make up plant tissues.
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Coal formed from the accumulation of dead land plants, usually from a swampy setting. As plants and trees died, their remains sank to the bottom of the swampy areas, accumulating layer upon layer and eventually forming a soggy, dense material called peat. Today, in the Great Dismal Swamp (North Carolina and Virginia), the Okefenokee Swamp (Georgia), and the Everglades (Florida), plants die and are buried.
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It is composed nearly entirely of organic carbon. A modern analog is a coastal mangrove swamp.
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This note was uploaded on 04/11/2008 for the course EVSC 280 taught by Professor Herman during the Spring '08 term at UVA.

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Lecture 14 Feb 20 2008 Coal - A human being consumes...

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