Week 3 Reading Notes - First Waves of Asian Immigration - AAS 20A Week 3 Reading Notes Takaki Strangers from a Different Shore Chapter 2 Overblown with

Week 3 Reading Notes - First Waves of Asian Immigration -...

This preview shows page 1 - 3 out of 6 pages.

AAS 20A Week 3 Reading Notes Takaki Strangers from a Different Shore Chapter 2 Overblown with Hope The First Wave of Asian Immigration “Get Labor First”: The American Errand into the WildernessWilliam Hooper first sugar plantation in Hawaii oChinese laborers’ efficiency> native Hawaiians oWhite man determined to advance the progress of civilization Aaron Palmer San Francisco great emporium of commerce on the Pacific oChinese to build the railroad and cultivate California Moral convulsion not to let the land lie in waste oRemake new world in their image ideological and economic o1848 western edge of continent ready to advance market civilization into Asia oProtestant morality and technological power oManifest destiny Get labor first and capital will followoSugar industryoNative Hawaiian workers were not abundantly available not easily disciplinedo1850 Royal Hawaiian Agricultural Society introduce workers from ChinaWent on to get Asian laboroLaborers as commoditiesEthnically diverse work force as a mechanism for controloChinese as an example for Hawaiian workersoTurned to Portuguese and Japanese workers to offset Chinese dependencyoDifferent nationalities less danger of collusionPuerto Rican, Italians, Negroes, Koreans, FilipinosPit workers against each othero1909 Japanese strike Filipinos brought in to bring the Japanese to their sensesAsian as a new source of labor for American capitalismoSteam transportationoWhites weren’t willing to work as field laborers, Asians wereoChinese workers could defuse white labor movement by offering white workers hopes of becoming capitalists as foremen Also used to discipline white workers to break strikesReady to work for small wagesRacial antagonismoBoost supply of labor and drive down wages
Asian Indian labor to stop Japanese demands for higher wagesMexican labor not aggressive; Filipino laborCalifornia farmers didn’t want exclusion –allowed them to exercise control over workersAsian workers driven by “necessity” and stirred by “extravagance”Tan Heung Shan and Gam Saan Wah gungChinese laborers sojourners hoping to work and return home rich Tan Heung ShanFragrant Sandalwood Hills Hawaiian Islands Gam SaanGold Mountain California Greatest outflow of Chinese between 1840 and 1900 ********Push factors: oBritish Opium Wars Harsh economic conditions Large indemnities to Western imperialist powers Qing government imposed high taxes Farmers lost lands oPeasant rebellions

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture