Chapter 17 Answers

Chapter 17 Answers - Chapter 17 Gene Regulation in...

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Chapter 17: Gene Regulation in Eukaryotes There are four main differences between prokaryotic and eukaryotic gene regulation: 1. No operons 2. Presence of chromatin 3. More positive control 4. Regulation at multiple levels There are six levels of gene regulation in eukaryotes (actually there is another one that was recently discovered and is discussed last). We’ve covered them before but now we’ll cover each one in more detail. Changes in Chromatin Structure DNA tightly bound to histone proteins cannot be transcribed because the enzymes cannot physically reach the DNA. However, when a gene becomes transcriptionally active it can be reached by an assortment of enzymes, including DNase I which degrades DNA. Thus, regions that are transcriptionally active also have ____ DNAse 1 hypersensitivity _____________________ (2 words). Histone proteins hold the DNA in place with their __ positive ______ charge since DNA has a __ negative _______________ charge. When an ______ acetyl ________ group is added to the histones, these proteins now have a neutral charge and can no longer hold onto the DNA tightly. Loose DNA = Active transcription The enzyme that adds the acetyl group to the histone proteins is called a __ acetyltransferase ___. The enzyme that takes the acetyl group away is called a
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Chapter 17 Answers - Chapter 17 Gene Regulation in...

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