Ancient Greece Mar 21 Exam 3

Ancient Greece Mar 21 Exam 3 - Ancient Greece GREEK TRAGEDY...

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Ancient Greece Mar 21 Exam 3 GREEK TRAGEDY Etymology: tragodia, “song of the goat” o Tragos = goat o How to get “tragedy” from that? There are no goats parading across the stage Rustic genre in the beginning Is always linked with celebrations of the god, Dionysus Dionysus, symbol = goat “song of the goat” History – 3 stages according to Aristotle 1) improvisional song o 6 th C BC o Song for Dionysus , to his glory o Dithyrambic song Singing and dancing in tune to a poem Later becomes tragic chorus 1 member of the chorus then breaks off and becomes an actor , the rest of the chorus will stay and sing 2) aeschylean song o 478 BC o Two actors o physically separates the chorus from actors talks to the actors but doesn’t become part of the action o Actors on stage, Chorus would be dancing in the pit of the stage
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o Protagonist 1 actor is more important that the other Tragic hero 3) sophoclean song o 450 BC – 406 BC o 3 actors Sophocles adds another actor o Adds notion of scenery in a more developed form > backgrounds, houses o Euripidean Chorus become even more divorced from action Becomes a group of people commenting on what’s going on on stage Satyr – plays Has to do with Dionysus Satyr = half man, half goat They are usually partying Take traditional myths and humanize it by adding satires to it Most greek tragedy’s are made in 3 parts, the satires for the 4 th part Meter Trochaic tetrameter o Dionysus’ song o Iamb: short-long o One meter of tragedy Iambic trimester o Represents the natural speech rhythm according to Aristotle
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Without thinking about it, Ancient Greek tends to fall into short and long syllables when spoken Means that people on stage are speaking like the Greeks in the audience o Trochee: long – short Strong song element > the chorus is always singing Aristotle’s Definition “what’s going on on stage is not an actual action.” Tragedy is an imitation of an action Action has to be admirable o Has to be some uplifting purpose to going around killing everyone on stage Didactic = aims to teach lessons to the audience o Had a beginning, middle, and end o Beginning = prologue (situation is explained) o Middle = action takes place o End = loose ends are tied up o Possesses magnitude Has relevance Tragedy is suppose to induce pleasure The audience should not be feeling pity and fear; they’ve worked through those emotions Place of Origin? Originates in the Peloponnese according to Aristotle Doesn’t originate in Athens Originates in Megara, an area southwest of Athens
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o But its also known in places like Sparta It migrates to Athens Originates in 6 th C BC It is originally performed in the countryside The Greek Theater
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This note was uploaded on 04/14/2008 for the course CC 31915 taught by Professor Beaulieu during the Spring '07 term at University of Texas at Austin.

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Ancient Greece Mar 21 Exam 3 - Ancient Greece GREEK TRAGEDY...

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