Midterm Lecture Material - Lecture 1 May 13th Why study sex...

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Lecture 1 May 13 th Why study sex? Essential biological function Health and well-being Most people do it It is the focus of much attention Social issues History and the Basics Rules disproportionately written by men, disproportionately applied to women The more educated, wealthy a region is  more positive attitudes towards sex Taoism Spiritual energy to be shared between men and women (yin and yang) Christianity Lust considered a deadly sin Early Christians – sex for procreation only Middle Ages – lust, wet dreams, sexual dysfunction blamed on witchcraft Protestant Reformation – sex for procreation AND to enhance marital relationship Victorian Era – extreme sexual repression, marital duty for procreation and men’s pleasure (chastity belts) History of Sex Research Richard Freiherr von Krafft-Ebing o First person to document every case o Non-procreative sex was a pervasion Paradoxia – sexual desire at the wrong time of life Anesthesia – insufficient sexual desire In current DSM (under different name), mostly women Hyperesthesia – excessive sexual desire Mostly men, not in DSM Paraesthesia – sexual desire for the wrong goal or object Fetishes for things not related to procreation (eg. feet, homosexuality) o First to attribute sexual orientation to biological causes Sigmund Freud o Everything tied to sex Alfred Kinsey
o First to publish major sex survey (but highly biased sample) o Inflated rates of homosexuality and extramarital sex o Scale of homosexuality  most people in grey area Masters and Johnson o First to look at physiological sexual responses o Highly biased sample o 4-phase model of sexual response The Basics anatomy context sexual behaviour: o may include genital and non-genital sexual expression o may or may not include sexual arousal and orgasm Cross-Cultural differences Canada is more liberal and tolerant (less religious) Higher teen pregnancy rate in US Within Canada Quebec most sexually liberal Immigrants in Canada tend to be more conservative Culture clash o Eg. arranged marriage, sex education, homosexuality, medical visits for sexual health, daughters (disproportionately affected by rules), etc. Average number of lifetime partners: 12 17% lifetime sexual monogamy >20 : 23% of men, 13% of women Sex Ed Sources of information o Parents: timing, quality o Friends/Siblings Terrible information o School (ie. Sex ed) o Media: entertainment o Internet o Pornography: mechanics vs. fantasy Canada Provinces set curriculum for schools SIECCAN has guidelines for sex ed (based on sex-positive model)  up to provinces to decide whether or not to use those guidelines Most programs focus on physiology, risk and danger (eg. unwanted pregnancy, STIs) Variation: depending on teacher, region
Abstinence-Only Sex Ed Students taught abstinence is the only acceptable behaviour

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