Ad_Analysis model.docx - Men’s Health Ad Analysis...

This preview shows page 1 out of 10 pages.

Unformatted text preview: Men’s Health Ad Analysis Persuasion is commonly used and seen throughout our lives. Advertisers have a tough job attempting to use persuasion effectively in their ads. Advertisers send in a picture with some persuading text, but they cannot adjust their argument once they see the reaction of their audience. All they know is what their audience should like, and if they get it wrong no one buys their product. In the November 2019 U.S. issue of Men’s Health featuring Sterling K. Brown two advertisers both presented their plant-based products. One succeeded in appealing to Men’s Health target audience, the other failed. The audience they needed to appeal to according to Magazine Networks, an organization that promotes and informs the public of various Australian published magazines, is, “MEN 25-44” (“Men’s Health”). Not only are they young to middle aged and middle-class. According to Folio, a magazine founded in 1984 at American University, “Men’s Journal leads the pack with a median [household income] of $77,063, followed by Men’s Health ($76,865), GQ ($68,746), Men’s Fitness ($68,486) and Maxim ($65,614)” (Pettas). The average Men’s Health reader is young to middle aged with a higher median household income than other primarily male magazines. This is the audience the advertisements need to target while also maintaining the lifestyle that Men’s Health provides. Men’s Health says, “We give men the tools they need to make their lives better through in-depth and expert-backed reporting, covering everything from fashion and grooming to health, nutrition, fitness, weight loss, as well as cutting-edge gear, the latest in entertainment, science, and more” (“Meet the Editors of Men's Health”). The target audience is young to middle aged men looking for a physically healthier life with the money to afford it. This first ad is one my group considered effective. The ad is from Raised & Rooted and they produce healthier plant-based alternatives to traditionally fatty meat products. The ad itself is amazing. At first glance, the burger looks like a juicy meaty burger with bright, vibrant colors that are right in the face of the reader. Like the crisp red of the tomato in the middle, the purple of the red onion above it, the subtle green of the lettuce at the bottom, or the bright green guacamole on top. The tomato bright red is the first thing that catches the reader’s eyes. It even dominates the colossal text in the upper left of the page. Then at second glance the buns are not ordinary buns, but healthier looking. Then guacamole has diced tomato peeking out of the right side. Not to mention the cheese is not plain old American cheese, but melted pepper jack cheese. The burger looks dominating and manly, yet oddly healthy. The ad also contains large text on the upper left side of the page in a unique font and shade of white that is partially see-through. It reads “LEAFY MEETS BEEFY” (Ad for Raised & Rooted). With each word commanding its own line. Below that reads smaller bolded, emphasized white text: 50% plant protein 50% angus beef 40% less calories* 60% less saturated fat* (Ad for Raised & Rooted) Then at the bottom in a separated recycling green colored section it provides a picture of what the product will look like in stores and on the right, it reads, “RAISED & ROOTED” (Ad for Raised & Rooted). Then under their company name in the same unique font and see-through white shade, “PLANTS MADE MEATIER” (Ad for Raised & Rooted). Raised & Rooted did an amazing job with this advertisement because it appeals directly to Men’s Health’s base. The first thing the reader notices is the delicious burger with the juicy patty and the traditional burger vegetables. Closer examination reveals that this no average joe burger, but a fancy burger with pepper jack cheese, healthy buns, and guacamole on top. The average Men’s Health reader wants this burger because it plays to their desire for sophistication and manlier items according to the target audience info for Men’s Health. Close examination reveals this burger is half angus beef, half plant protein, and perfect for a healthy lifestyle. After looking at the burger the viewer turns into a reader and examines the text blocking the left side of the burger. They look at the massive white text that covers a lot of burger but also does not. The see-through white text is a large and easy to read but is still secondary to the burger because of the see-through white text. The phrase is also catchy with a nice rhyme to help stick this in the person’s mind. Then the comeback with smaller text. It is easier to focus on than the last phrase because it is almost bolded, like they are emphasizing that this is the most important factual evidence of the ad and it is. They get the best of both worlds with healthy food and angus beef. It will provide protein for working out while not fattening them up with an American classic. They also positioned the text very well; they ensured the text would not cover or detract from their tasty burger. Every important topping, the cheese, red onion, and tomato peeking out of the guacamole are on the right and away from the text on the left. Then the put the tomato on the left, but it is such a bright red that it cancels out the text. They ensured the text would not be overpowered by the burger and the text would not detract from the burger. This ad was an amazing choice for the audience. The ad and Men’s Health are both directed at health conscientious men. Men may be hesitant to try a plant product because it goes against the manly stereotype, but the ad softens the blow by making it appear manly and delicious. Then they close reading out the facts, there are less calories, less fat, and it is half angus beef. In the same issue of Men’s Health, Arm & Hammer promotes their new plant-based deodorant. The focus of the image is a hippie couple. The couple are both wearing sandals and a light green shirt that says kalefest. In the small blurred background kalefest reveals itself near the top of the picture. It is on a large grassy field with umbrellas a large festival tent, and some other people. The unblurred part of the ad, the focus, contains the couple in a small field of kale with a small white sign with green text that says, “Welcome to Kalefest” (Ad for Arm & Hammer). The boyfriend is pushing his girlfriend in a yellow wheelbarrow full of kale while she waves it around like a prize. Both of them have an unappealing laugh and it really is indescribable, but one look and people know why. and the girl is wearing crystal blue contact lenses, a crystal from her forehead, and a flower in her hair. Then separating the picture with the argument of their advertisement is an odd yellow line that is the same color as the wheelbarrow. In a matching green tone to the rest of the ad it reads, “Natural, without going overboard” (Ad for Arm & Hammer). Followed by miniature text, “There’s natural, then there’s too natural. Essentials Deodorant from Arm & Hammer is free of aluminum and parabens, and made with odor-fighting Baking Soda and natural plant extracts. Available in four fresh scents” (Ad for Arm & Hammer). And on the left it presents a picture of Arm & Hammer’s new plant deodorant. This ad is awful because it is misleading, appeals poorly to its audience, and has a bad color scheme. When first looking at this page the reader will think this is an ad incentivizing hippies and kale, something wildly despised by a manly, sophisticated audience. The only time they will realize they do not support the actions above is in the small, unappealing green section at the bottom which appears to fill a fifth of the page. In there they write, “Natural, without going overboard” (Ad for Arm & Hammer). Then in miniature text they help explain what they mean by the phrase above. What they mean is our deodorant is not as crazy as the hippies that look high on “life”; our deodorant includes healthier plant-based products while keeping the user smelling good. However, the audience will not understand this without a magnifying glass and the patience to not flip to the next page. Their only phrases that disassociate them from hippies and kale are, “Natural, without going overboard” & “There’s natural, then there’s too natural” (Ad for Arm & Hammer). Every reader will believe that this is an add promoting a hippy and kale loving lifestyle. The picture of kale is too dominating and the small section where they argue against it is small text against a vomit green background with an ugly yellow-orange background. This ad can be improved with some changes, but it still may never work for this audience. Men’s Health states, “We give men the tools they need to make their lives better through in-depth and expert-backed reporting, covering everything from fashion and grooming to health, nutrition, fitness, weight loss, as well as cutting-edge gear, the latest in entertainment, science, and more” (“Meet the Editors of Men's Health”). These men want good fashion and primarily tips to improve their physical appearance like healthy eating and working out, not healthy deodorants. Also, the front cover of this November 2019 issue of Men’s Health shows three out of the six items on the front page promoting better physical appearance. It also includes an image of the muscular Sterling K. Brown. Also, since these men are working out, they do not want deodorant because of this information from Dove, “Deodorant protects against odor, while antiperspirant protects against sweat and odor” (“Antiperspirant vs. Deodorant: What Is the Difference?”). They will obviously be sweating, and no amount of fresh smells will cover the pit stains on their expensive, fashionable clothing. Then seeing the image of poorly groomed hippies goes against the point of the magazine. Finally, the advertisement itself is unappealing from a color standpoint. The advertisement is a sea of bland green with only one contrasting color. The ugly yellow orange mix of the wheelbarrow and the line separating the picture and the text. Not to mention the unappealing sight of the hippies laugh and style. Plant-based burgers succeeded in their advertisement over plant-based deodorant. The deodorant made little distinction between themselves and the poorly dressed hippies that alienates their audience. The plant-based burger is perfect for this audience. They provide a healthier patty that still contains angus beef for those conscious of their health. If that does not win them over, the vibrant colors of the perfectly burger will. That is why Raised & Rooted did such a good job and Arm & Hammer did such a horrible job. Works Cited Ad for Arm & Hammer. Men’s Health, November 2019 Ad for Raised & Rooted. Men’s Health, November 2019 “Antiperspirant vs. Deodorant: What Is the Difference?” Dove US, . “Meet the Editors of Men's Health.” Men's Health, Men's Health, 25 Oct. 2019, . “Men’s Health.” Magazine Networks, . Pettas, Joanna. “Who's Reading Magazines? - Folio:” Folio, Folio, 30 Nov. 2007, . ...
View Full Document

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture