week6_lecture - Lecture Print DetailedDesign...

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Detailed Design Component Design | Coupling and Cohesion | Summary Even if you skipped all the requirements analysis activities, the two activities that are guaranteed to be completed in any software development are method design and coding. As a result, for many of you, detailed design is probably the most familiar of the activities you have accomplished so far. You all have taken some programming classes where, at least informally, you have designed classes and generated method algorithms. However, what you may not have done in your design and subsequent coding is apply good design principles or take advantage of reuse. Therefore, in this lecture, we will discuss component design and some of the basic design principles of coupling and cohesion and we begin the discussion by investigating what are "good" design criteria. Now that the preliminary design is complete and you have an organized layout or blueprint of the system, it is time to define the details. Let's go back to last week's example of building a house. During the preliminary design of the house, the house was organized into partitions based on functional use. All rooms with the same function were grouped together and designed at a high level. Now, it is time to design the details of each room within each partition. The detailed design for each room in the house will include all of the specifics such as paint color or wallpaper, flooring specifics (carpet, tile, wood), furnishings, etc. In systems design, these are commonly referred to as components or modules . The detailed design of the components become the package design specifications . These will be used to communicate the specific architectural requirements to those who will build the application you have designed. Last week, we introduced the following as an outline for the Software Design Specification, tailored from the IEEE Standard 1016, that you are using for your project. 1. Scope a. System Description b. Major Software Functions c. Database Description d. Design Constraints and Limitations Print

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