jefferson - Thomas Jefferson Thomas Jefferson, our third...

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Thomas Jefferson Thomas Jefferson, our third president, served two terms from 1801 to 1809. Thomas Jefferson was born on April 13, 1743, in Shadwell Virginia. His mother was a member of a prominent colonial family, while his father was a farmer. He went to the college of William and Mary. Jefferson started building Monticello, which was the place he retired to, when he was twenty-six years old. He married Martha Wayles Skelton at twenty-nine, and conceived six children, of which only two survived into adulthood. Martha Wayles Skelton and Thomas Jefferson were happily for ten years until Martha sadly passed away. Jefferson never remarried. While at the College of William and Mary, Jefferson studied law, science, literature, philosophy and served as a magistrate in local government. In his early professional life, he was a member of the Virginia House of Burgesses. In 1774, he wrote a pamphlet called "A Summary of Views of the Rights of British America." This pamphlet argued that
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the basis of the Natural Rights Theory, and it claimed that allegiance to the King was voluntary. Thomas Jefferson became governor of Virginia from 1779 to 1781. As governor, he attempted to reform the penal code, to abolish the inheritance policies of "primogeniture and entail," and to establish a complete system of public education. During his last year as governor, he received and inquiry about his conduct, which left the rest of his life open to criticism. After he was governor, he wrote "Notes on the State of Virginia." In 1779, Jefferson introduced a bill dealing with religious liberty. This bill caused turmoil in Virginia for eight years because it contains Jefferson's disparaging views regarding Native Americans and African-Americans.    In this bill, Jefferson stated "All men have freedom to profess, and by argument to maintain, their opinions on matters of religion, and that the same shall in no wise diminish, change, or affect their civil capacities." Many people regarded this as an attack on Christianity. The
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work covers the geography, flora, and fauna of Virginia, as well as a description of its social, economic, and political structure. The second Continental Congress, in 1775, became the nation's first national government. Jefferson, along with four others from the government, wrote the Declaration of Independence. Most of this was the work of Thomas Jefferson. This document states that all men are created equal regardless of religion, race, or wealth, and that the government serves the people, the people don't serve the government. The Declaration is considered the foremost literary work of the American Revolution and the single most important political document in American
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jefferson - Thomas Jefferson Thomas Jefferson, our third...

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