FinalPhysicsLab_AC_Circuits

FinalPhysicsLab_AC_Circuits - α(2 =(x/D*360 degrees = 69.4...

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Physics Lab 5: AC Circuits We began this lab by attaching a resistor in series with an AC Voltage source, a function generator and an oscilloscope. The input and output voltage graphs were displayed on the oscilloscope and were visually inspected for time offset. We found no such time offset, which is to be expected, since V(R) = I(R)*Z(R) = I(R)*R should be valid at any frequency. After this, we varied the signal frequency using the function generator and observed the ratio of V(in) and V(out) as we did. We found that the amplitudes changed fairly linearly. We deduced from these experiments that the impedance of a resistor is not frequency-dependent. Is the section in which we were to measure the phase difference, our results were as follows: x = 1420 ns D = 21 us = 21,000 ns α(1) = (x/D)*360 degrees = 24.3 degrees And the second time: x = 4050 ns D = 21 us = 21,000 ns
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Unformatted text preview: α(2) = (x/D)*360 degrees = 69.4 degrees α(1) + α(2) = 93.7 degrees. Ideally, α(1) + α(2) would equal exactly 90 degrees, however given the factors that we are working with, this is within experimental error. In the next section, we found that V(c) has an inverse relationship to frequency. And also that a capacitor’s impedance decreases with frequency, because X(C) = 1/(w*C) = 1/(2*pi*f*C). For question 1-6, our calculations gave us: X = 4467 nanoseconds D = 5610 ns (X/D)*360 degrees = (4467/5610)*360 degrees = 286.65 degrees And X = 1450 ms D = 11450 ms Thus (x/D)*360 degrees = 45.59 degrees As would be predicted by the equation V = I*Z, we found that the amplitude was not dependent upon frequency. We did, however, find that the inductor’s impedance increased with frequency, as would be predicted by the equation X(L) = 2*pi*f*L....
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