policy problem 3

policy problem 3 - Some say that the reason to study...

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Some say that the reason to study history is to learn from the past mistakes of others so that they are not repeated. This theory holds true today and will continue to be an important consideration when using historical analogies in an effort to make decisions about a current issue. Over the past few years, political scientists and scholars alike have been comparing the Iraq War with the Vietnam War, looking for similarities and differences all across the board. However, it is crucial to follow three basic rules before employing the use of historical analogies to make decisions in contemporary scenarios. The first rule that decision makers must abide by is to examine the values and ideologies of the citizens of the target nations in both cases, past and present. It is essential to verify that the change that the U.S. is imposing on the target state is something that the people of that state want and support. All too often, a change has been forced onto a state, and the state in turn fervently rejects it. Therefore, the decision makers must evaluate whether the change made in the past was supported or not, and then use resources to find out whether the decision at hand would be well received from the target nation. By comparing the past ideological bases with the present ones, decision
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policy problem 3 - Some say that the reason to study...

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