Healthcare in the US 2

Healthcare in the US 2 - Healthcare in the US What not to...

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Healthcare in the US: What not to do In the United States, although not perfect, we have a working private/public healthcare system. Many say that this system is not working for this country and that changes need to be made. While they may be right in saying that changes need to be made -- “universal” or “socialized” healthcare is NOT the answer. There are so many problems with universal healthcare that if the US were to switch to a universal system, it would do much more harm than good. One problem with our healthcare system is that it is much more controlled than most consumers realize. Jane Orient who is an M.D. in Tuscan, Arizona says, “…that’s the number-one problem. It’s what people dislike most about out medical system today -- managed care” (6). Orient goes on to explain this problem a bit more. “Insurance has morphed into managed care. In other words, it has been turned upside down. Subscribers don’t get money that they can use, as they see fit, to make themselves whole after a loss. Instead they get case management -- that is, whatever medical service providers (who basically work for the insurer) decide to render under whatever terms the insurer decides to set” (7). If this country were to switch to a universal healthcare system, this issue of control would only get worse -- that’s what universal healthcare is, it is entirely controlled by the government. Some believers in universal healthcare claim “that 43 million Americans are uninsured and many more are underinsured” this is an attempt to “convey the idea that many in the United States are being turned away from doctors’ offices and hospitals when they seek medical attention” (Behreandt
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4). These claims made by proponents of the universal system are skewed and do not speak the truth. These numbers are “not indicative of the number of people who cannot get medical care. It shows the number of people who at sometime throughout the year let their health insurance lapse” (Behreandt 4). Another factor that contributes to the 43 million who aren’t insured is immigration. “According to a study published in 2000 by the Center for Immigration Studies, in
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Healthcare in the US 2 - Healthcare in the US What not to...

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