tobuildafire

tobuildafire - Jack London's"To Build a Fire is a short...

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Jack London’s “To Build a Fire” is a short story based in the Yukon region of North America during the late 1800s gold rush. The third-person omniscient story is a great example of naturalism. The story follows the narrator as he treks through the Klondike in freezing temperatures with his dog. Along the way, the naturalistic themes of destiny, pessimism, and the mercy of nature ultimately decide his fate. The opening setting immediately details and describes a common naturalistic theme, pessimism. “Day had broken cold and gray, exceedingly cold and gray” (p.825). Naturalism is almost always in a bleak and pessimistic setting as it deals with real-world problems, no fairy tales. Throughout the store the weather plays into the pessimistic and bleak tone, causing his dog to fall though the ice, instantly numbing his hands when he removed his gloves, and snow falling from a tree drowning out his fire with snow. “It descended without warning upon the man and the fire, and the fire was blotted out!” (p.830) The weather is not the only setting element that denotes bleak naturalism. “The
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tobuildafire - Jack London's"To Build a Fire is a short...

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