We Should all be Feminists - ] melikeabigbrother.IfIlikedaboy,Iwouldask]sopinion]diedinthenotorious]planecrashinNigeria inDecemberof2005,],

We Should all be Feminists - ]...

This preview shows page 1 - 2 out of 6 pages.

So I would like to start by telling you about one of my greatest friends, [--]. [--] lived on my street and looked after  me like a big brother. If I liked a boy, I would ask [--]‘s opinion. [--] died in the notorious [--] plane crash in Nigeria  in December of 2005, almost exactly 7 years ago. [--] was a person I could argue with, laugh with and truly talk to.  He was also the first person to call me a feminist. I was about 14, we were in his house, arguing, both of us bristling  with half-bit knowledge from books that we had read. I don’t remember what this particular argument was about,  but I remember that as I argued and argued, [--] looked at me and said, “You know, you’re a feminist.” It was not a  compliment. I could tell from his tone, the same tone that you would use to say something like, “You’re a supporter  of terrorism.” I did not know exactly what this word “feminist” meant and I did not want [--] to know that I did not  know. So I brushed it aside and continued to argue. And the first thing that I planned to do when I got home was to  look up “feminist” in the dictionary. Now, fast-forward to some years later. I wrote a novel about a man who, among other things beats his wife and  whose story doesn’t end very well. When I was promoting the novel in Nigeria, a journalist, a nice well-meaning  man told me he wanted to advise me. And to the Nigerians here, I’m sure we’re all familiar with how quick are  people to give unsolicited advise. He told me that people were saying that my novel was feminist and his advice to  me — and he was shaking his head sadly as he spoke — was that I should never call myself a feminist because  feminists are women who are unhappy because they cannot find husbands. So I decided to call myself a “happy  feminist.” Then, an academic, a Nigerian woman told me that feminism was not our culture, that feminism wasn’t  Africa, and that I was calling myself a feminist because I had been corrupted by “Western” books, which amused  me because a lot of my early reading was decidedly un-feminist. I think I must have read every single [--] published  before I was 16. And each time I try to read those books called the “feminists classics” I get bored, and I really  struggle to finish them. But anyway, since feminism was un-African, I decided I would now call myself a happy  African  feminist. At some point I was a happy African feminist who does not hate men and who likes lip gloss and  who wears high heels for herself but not for men. Of course a lot of this was tongue-in-cheek, but that word 
Image of page 1
Image of page 2

You've reached the end of your free preview.

Want to read all 6 pages?

  • Spring '11
  • JonMann
  • Louis

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

Stuck? We have tutors online 24/7 who can help you get unstuck.
A+ icon
Ask Expert Tutors You can ask You can ask You can ask (will expire )
Answers in as fast as 15 minutes