Chapter_7

Chapter_7 - Waves in the Ocean The properties of ocean...

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Unformatted text preview: Waves in the Ocean The properties of ocean waves Wind generation of waves Wave motion The life history of ocean waves Standing waves Progressive waves Properties of Ocean Waves A wave is an undulation of the surface of a liquid. Some terms Wave crest Wave trough Wave height Wave length Wave period Wave-generating forces Wind Generation of Waves The type of wave generated by wind is determined by: Wind velocity Wind duration Fetch Simply put, wave size increases as the speed and duration of the wind and the distance over which the wind blows increase. A fully developed sea is a sea state in which the waves generated by the wind are as large as they can be given the wind speed and fetch. Conditions Required for a Fully Developed Sea Significant wave height is the average of the highest 1/3 of the waves present. It is a good indicator of potential for wave damage to ships and for erosion of shorelines because it measures the waves with the most energy in them. Progressive waves are waves that move across a surface. As waves pass, the wave form and wave energy move rapidly forward, but the water does not to a first approximation. Water molecules move in an orbital motion as the wave passes. Diameter of orbit increases with increasing wave size and decreases with depth below the water surface. Wave base is the depth to which a surface wave can move water. If the water is deeper than wave base, orbits are circular, and the wave does not interact with the bottom. If the water is shallower than wave base, orbits are elliptical and become increasingly flattened towards the bottom. Three types of waves Deep water Shallow water Intermediate water...
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This note was uploaded on 04/13/2008 for the course OCE 1001 taught by Professor Staff during the Spring '08 term at FSU.

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Chapter_7 - Waves in the Ocean The properties of ocean...

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