Chapter_9s

Chapter_9s - Chapter 9. Marine Ecology Ecology is the study...

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Chapter 9. Marine Ecology Ecology is the study of the interrelationships between the physical and biological aspects of the environment. In this chapter, we will learn about: Ocean habitats The classification of organisms Basic ecology Adaptive strategies
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A convenient way to sub-divide the ocean is to distinguish the sea bottom, the benthic province, from the water column, the pelagic province.
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The pelagic province includes : The neritic zone, which overlies the continental shelf. The oceanic zone, which overlies the open sea beyond the shelf break.
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The pelagic province can also be sub-divided on the basis of water depth.
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Ocean Habitats We can subdivide the pelagic province based on the amount of light that penetrates. Light penetration depends on color (wavelength) Red disappears quickly. Blue penetrates hundreds of meters.
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This vertical classification based on light indicates the importance of light to marine organisms. In the photic zone , sufficient light exists for photosynthesis. In the dysphotic zone , some light is present but not enough for photosynthesis. In the aphotic zone , sunlight is absent. Ocean Habitats
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Kingdom Monera Monerans are single celled and lack a nucleus. The group includes: Bacteria , which are important because they decompose dead plants and animals and return important nutrients to seawater. Blue-green algae , which are important because they can use nitrogen gas to photosynthesize. Blue-green algae Scanning electron micrograph of bacteria
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Kingdom Protista - Protists are unicellular and possess a true nucleus. The group includes plants and animals, as well as organisms with characteristics of both groups. Protists are critical in the food web, and their remains contribute to sedimentary deposits on the sea floor. Some protists under the light microscope
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Common members of the Kingdom Protista Dinoflagellates Foraminiferans Diatoms Coccolithophores
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Kingdom Fungi - The fungi occur widely in the ocean. Like bacteria, they are important agents of decomposition. A coral with a fungus growing on it
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This note was uploaded on 04/13/2008 for the course OCE 1001 taught by Professor Staff during the Spring '08 term at FSU.

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Chapter_9s - Chapter 9. Marine Ecology Ecology is the study...

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