Marbury V Madison - 1 Prepareatwotothree(23)...

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1. Prepare a two to three (2-3) page briefing on the case that you reviewed in which you utilize the following areas of importance: a) issue presented; b) short answer; c) the facts of the case; d) a summary of the case; and e) a conclusion of the case outcome. 2. Review the concept of judicial review, and explain the fundamental manner in which the Court obtained the power of judicial review. 3. Interpret the following quote from Thomas Jefferson in a letter to W.C. Jarvis, dated Sept. 28, 1820: “It is very dangerous doctrine to consider the judges as the ultimate authority of all constitutional questions.” Provide a rationale for your interpretation. 4. Specify whether or not you believe Chief Justice John Marshall’s claim of the power of judicial review for the resources. The specific course learning outcomes associated with this assignment are: #3references articles and books only.
Marbury V. Madison Name Institution Tutor Course Date
Marbury V. Madison is termed as the most significant event in the United States Supreme Court history. The case established the grounds for judicial review in the United States using the provisions of Article III. The final decision also defined the boundaries within which the judicial and executive branches of the government operate. This made the judiciary an independent arm of the government at par with congress and the executive. During the presidential elections of 1800, Thomas Jefferson, a democratic republican, won and became the third President of the United States but he was not in power until March 4, 1801. During this interim period, the outgoing president Adams still controlled a lame-duck government together with the sixth congress. It was also during this period that the congress approved the Judiciary Act of 1801 as a modification to the Judiciary Act of 1789. Adams chose numerous justices whose commissions were signed by the president, approved by the senate, and had the government’s official seal. For the commissions to be effective, they had to be delivered to the appointees, a task that fell on James Madison. Some of the appointed judges never received their commissions and when President Jefferson got into office on March 5, he asked James Madison, the then Secretary of State, to withhold delivery of the remaining commissions.

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