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Theo231ChurchingChurersXW5YJ.doc - 46. See, for example,...

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46.See, for example, the accusations against Sadler in The Tables Turned. A Reply to a Non-Elector Signing Himself Common Sense (Leeds 1832),Thoresby Society Library, ElectionMaterials 22C1.On Oastler’s difficult relationship with the Operative Conservative Associationin Leeds from 1836onward, see section ‘Oastler’s Friends? The Operative ConservativeAssociations after 1842’below. On the political consequences of his anti-Catholicism, see C.Driver, Tory Radical, 359.47.See Gill, Ten Hours Parson; idem, Parson Bull; and D.G. Wright, ‘ARadical Borough: Parliamentary Politics in Bradford 1832–1841’, Northern History 4(1969),132–66.48.J.T. Ward, Factory Movement, 423–25,counts over twenty-eight parish vicars inthe north of England, not including Anglican bishops, with links to the Tories, who took part inthe activities of the factory movement. 49.Leeds Intelligencer, 29December 1831.50.LeedsIntelligencer, 25February 1837.Patrick Brontë was the father of the literary Brontë siblingswho grew up in Haworth. 51.Leeds Intelligencer, 24March 1831.52.
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