rhetoricl argument lesson plan - Student\/Class Goal Students realize that persuasive messages in advertisements songs speeches and everyday

rhetoricl argument lesson plan - Student/Class Goal...

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Rhetorical Argument Ethos, Pathos, Logos Student/Class Goal Students realize that persuasive messages in advertisements, songs, speeches and everyday communication can be analyzed during a transitions course. They want to improve their writing in preparation for writing courses in college. Outcome ( lesson objective) Student will be able to determine the rhetorical strategy used in media. Students write an argumentative essay using ethos, pathos and logos. Time Frame Up to 10 weeks Standard Convey Ideas in Writing NRS EFL 6 Prewriting Benchmark Draftin Benchmark Editing and Benchmarks Topic, purpose, & 6.1 Organize writing 6.10 Reread & revise 6.14 Writing for purpose 6.2 Sentences/paragraphs Proofread 6.15 Writing for various tasks 6.3 Descriptive language 6.11 Feedback from others 6.16 Generate ideas 6.4 Sentence structure 6.12 Checklists & rubrics Main idea/thesis 6.5 Spelling 6.13 Publishing Benchmarks Research 6.6 Punctuation Technology 6.17 Plagiarism 6.7 Capitalization Publication 6.18 Sources 6.8 Parts of speech Organize ideas 6.9 Organizational pattern Common Core State Standards Materials The Rhetorical Triangle Handout/Overhead Definition & Example Matching Activity Handout Arguing With Aristotle Email Handout Media Movie Clips- movie speech handouts Magazine advertisements Persuasion intro video- You Tube Learner Prior Knowledge Previous practice writing various forms of persuasive writing and determining appropriate topics. Experience using MLA format (might need to teach a mini-lesson on this form of style guide). Ability to do research effectively on a chosen topic.
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Instructional Activities Step 1 – The goal of argumentative writing is to persuade your audience that your ideas are valid, or more valid than someone else’s. The Greek philosopher Aristotle divided the persuasive appeals into three categories – ethos, pathos, and logos. These appeals are prevalent in almost all arguments. Introduce persuasion with E t h o s , P a th o s , L ogos Vi d e o . Step 2 – When taking college courses, students will need to become familiar with the term “rhetoric” – the art of speaking or writing effectively (Webster). According to Aristotle, rhetoric is ‘the ability, in each particular case, to see the available means of persuasion.’ He is describing ethos, logos, and pathos - show The Rhetorical Triangle overhead. Using the Definition & Example Matching Activity handout, create a matching activity for students, putting a definition and example on a card, total of six cards, writing the name of each argument on the back as the answer. Students work individually to complete matching activity then partner up to compare. Step 3 - Students and teacher will read and discuss Arguing with Aristotle and using the concepts of reason (logos) and character (ethos) and emotion (pathos) in writing. Students get into Rhetorical triangle groupings. (3 students per group, each student is a point of the triangle). Using 3 highlighters, mark out the appeals to character, emotion and reason in the email. Share your answers with someone in your group, discuss any differences, and justify your answers.
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