Lecture 1 - Vertebrate Structure & Development Zoology...

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Vertebrate Structure & Development Zoology 3405 Dr. Carleton J. Phillips Texas Tech University
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Introduction to the Course Office hours: 10:50-11:50 T-Th or by appointment POC: Ms. Hart Gonzales 742-3722 x 283 ( hart.gonzales@ttu.edu ) Syllabus, lecture, exam schedule, and power point presentations will be posted at course link. See www.biol.ttu.edu/fac_staff under C. J. Phillips Example(s) of lecture exam and answers will be posted
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Introduction to the Course Lectures (given by me) Laboratory sessions (TA’s are responsible) Began on Monday 27 August Use other lab session if you need makeup (expect quiz) Lectures are comprehensive and supported by a selected textbook Laboratories are intended for hands-on practical experience with anatomy 3 lecture exams + final + laboratory practical exams & quizes= grade for course (60:40)
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Introduction to the Course It is essential to attend lectures! We will take attendance and it will count toward final grade in lecture Lecture notes are the cornerstone information for the examinations Heavy emphasis on terms and concepts It is important to read the textbook (by Kardong): some exam questions will come directly from the textbook Makeup exams only by special permission See syllabus for details
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Introduction to the Course Basic rules (for those few who need to hear this stuff) Do not miss any exams Tell me now if you have other university obligations or needs The lecture hall is a place of business and cell phone use during lecture is not allowed Likewise, rude or distracting behaviors will result in your dismissal from the lecture hall and other (grade) penalties Thanks in advance for your cooperation
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Comparative Biology and Basic Concepts Reading: Chapter 1 (pages 1-46) in your textbook has excellent background information. (Kardong, K. V. Vertebrates Comparative Anatomy, Function, Evolution)
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Comparative Biology and Basic Concepts Photo by Merlin Tuttle Bats are great examples—they are vertebrates and mammals and they are adapted for flight. This species eats tropical fruit, which it finds in the forest, at night, and consumes while moving. Fruit is low in calories and protein, but high in carbohydrates. How can this species survive?
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Comparative Biology and Basic Concepts Historical overview Pre-Darwin view of animal life and taxonomy from the Greeks to Linnaeus Post-Darwinian view of the natural world Natural science, optical microscopy, cytology, embryology and university academics in the late 19 th Century
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This note was uploaded on 04/13/2008 for the course ZOOL 3405 taught by Professor Phillips during the Fall '08 term at Texas Tech.

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Lecture 1 - Vertebrate Structure & Development Zoology...

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