Global climate change and your carbon footprint (1)

Global climate change and your carbon footprint (1) - 1...

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1 Global Climate Change (Chapter 18)
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2 Word Bank Climate change, global warming Planetary albedo Greenhouse gases, greenhouse effect Climate, weather Heat capacity Sea level Photosynthesis, cellular respiration Producers, consumers Carbon footprint Carbon sequestration Biomass Hardwood, softwood
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3 Word Bank Climate change ≠ global warming Planetary albedo Greenhouse gases, greenhouse effect Climate, weather Heat capacity Increased temperatures + melting = sea level rise (thermal expansion of water + increased volume of water) 97.5%, 2.5%, 1.7%, 0.77% Photosynthesis, cellular respiration Producers, consumers Carbon footprint Carbon sequestration Biomass Hardwood, softwood Circumference, Diameter d=C/π
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4 Outline 1. What does the atmosphere have to do with global climate change? 2. Can you name 6 greenhouse gases (GHGs)? 3. How does the ocean have anything to do with climate change? 4. What exactly is "the greenhouse effect"?
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5 What does the atmosphere have to do with global climate change?
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6 An introduction to global climate change On August 29, 2005, Hurricane Katrina landed east of New Orleans The costliest ($134 billion in damage) storm ever The deadliest storm (killing 1,800) since 1928 Leaving mountains of debris, ruined homes and lives A month later, Hurricane Rita hit Louisiana and Texas 2005 had a record 27 named storms 2007 had 15 and 2008 had 18 named storms There is a link between hurricanes and global warming Warmer oceans create humid air, leading to hurricanes
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7 The atmosphere Atmosphere: a collection of gases held by gravity around the Earth Troposphere: the lowest level Gases moderate the flow of energy to Earth Gases are involved with biogeochemical cycling of elements Ranges from 5 to 10 miles thick Contains almost all the water vapor and clouds Gets colder with altitude Mixed air allows pollutants to reach the top of the layer
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8 Other atmospheric layers Tropopause: caps the troposphere Air shifts from cooling with height and begins to warm Stratosphere: temperature increases with altitude To 40 miles above Earth’s surface Ozone (O 3 ) absorbs the Sun’s high-energy radiation Due to little mixing and no precipitation, substances remain for long periods of time Mesosphere and thermosphere: declining ozone levels Only small amounts of oxygen and nitrogen
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9 Structure and temperature of the atmosphere
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10 Weather Weather: day-to-day variations in temperature, air pressure, wind, humidity, precipitation Climate: the result of long-term regional weather patterns Meteorology: the study of the atmosphere (weather and climate) The atmosphere-ocean-land system is a huge weather engine Driven by the Sun and affected by Earth’s rotation and tilt Solar energy is reflected or absorbed by Earth Absorbed energy heats the ocean, land, and atmosphere Evaporation, convection, and reradiation of infrared energy release energy
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11 Atmosphere, weather, and climate
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