Lesson+1 - EEL 3112 Circuits II Introduction 1 Lesson 1...

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Introduction Lesson 1 1 EEL 3112 – Circuits II
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Contact Data Lesson 1 2 Instructor: Dr. Fred J. Taylor, Professor Emeritus Office: 441 NEB e-mail: [email protected] Office hours: Before and after class Teaching Assistant Jordan Street, [email protected] 434 NEB (Office hours: TBA )
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Contact Data Lesson 1 3 Textbook: Electric Circuits, 8 th or 9 th edition, Nillison and Riedle, Prentice Hall (Pearson) Textbook website: http:// On-Line Services at lss.at.ufl.edu (Sakai) syllabus, grade reporting, supplemental resources, lessons, calendar, emailing, message posting,
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Process Lesson 1 4 Lessons will begin with a discussion of a Challenge Problem posed at the end of the previous lesson. Next, new material and a possible in-class activity will be used to introduce new material. Finally, a new Challenge Problem covering the new material will be posed. Challenge Problems are multiple-choice questions posted to the EEL 3112 website. They are auto-graded and entered into the class gradebook. On-line responses are due by 2:00PM on the day they are discussed . Most lectures will contain an in-class activity that may or may not be collected. (random). If collected they will be graded.
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Assessment (Tentative) Lesson 1 5 Database C = Challenge Problem plus in-class activity average Q = Hourly Exam average (3 exams) Tentative grade: Q’ = 0.96 × Q + 0.04 × C (100 point basis). Q’ will be converted into a guaranteed letter grade. Accept or take the optional final. With the optional final: Q’’ = 0.96 × (3 of 4 highest exam grades) + 0.04 × C Note: The optional final, whether taken or ignored, cannot lower your guaranteed letter grade.
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General information Lesson 1 6 Calendar: Schedule for the entire semester including exam dates! Any make up exam will require medical validation or notice of official UF travel. Exam Formats 50 minute exams are open book, open notes. All work will be submitted on pages provided. Laptops allowed with Internet access restricted to Sakai. Cell phones off!
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Course objectives: To produce better engineers. What is an engineer? Engineers design and innovate solutions to real problems within a constrained environment (technology, power, size, economic, sociological, and physiological. The mission of the engineer is to make everything done yesterday obsolete today. Engineering is not to be taught in isolation but in the context of a holistic experience. Lesson 1Lesson 1 7
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… and develop a world view. You have distracters. “Technology has left an ugly scare on the face of history. An ideology designed to empower the masses became one of the ruthless instruments of oppression. It is not enough to wire the world if you short circuit the soul.” – Tom Brokaw Lesson 1Lesson 1 8 Social media or anti-social media?
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… and meet marketplace demands Lesson 1 9
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