Practice test 2 - A!“ General Psyche-iogy Practice Test 2...

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Unformatted text preview: A!“ General Psyche-iogy Practice Test 2 Multipie Chaim Met-riff»- the fetter ofmc choice Hm: best e'erpt'eMt the statement or animal's If”. tiff-radian. |_ [fyelu are interesied in using classics] cutulizluning to train a new res-trons: tt't 3::th filimulus, it would be most eFl'ieie'nl 1n urn: .u. __ _ schedule1 because, [he will have the greulusL inibnnafifln value. .1 de layed: dist; rin11'native stimulus [1. Forward; diserirniuafive stimulus e. simultaneous: C3 :1. forward; CS '6 delahtl; ETH 1 When the [ICE is. removed and the CS is presented alone FM :1 perian at“ time. “than will fiat? ail.“ eLug-iWI wndhinning b. generflizafinn e. aflluisLLifln -_. L1. extinction 3-. Sall}r devetnped .1 Fear of halennies from almost falling. Mtlmugh 511:: hat-1 had 110 dangerous- experiences. on. hn'dges ur eEith, she netw Fears. these stimuli as we“. Which uflhu following is [ikcEy fl'r ha“: anJueed a feat fifth-es: nther stimuli? :a. irlHlirlELil‘fl drift [3. spontaneous recovery "p: generalizatinn J. disuimilmfima 4. A researcher re Lllforees closer and cluster appruximaliuns {U :1 target bLl'Jtfi‘I-‘I'CII. What 'ifi 1'11? name hi" the pmeedun: she is using? 'a__ shaping ‘ h eFassieal enndiliuniug e. discriiliinfiLifin training it. extinction S. John say-5h "Please the sull." Ralph passes tilt: 5:511. "'l'hank jr'l‘IIL" Hal-'5 101111. InhTI'h' Tfigucsl preeedes a hehavinr (52111 passing} that is minFnr-zcd {"Tl‘lank 1.1m"). Thus, HIE request "Fleas-e pass The salt" is a For passing. the Hall. a. discriminative slim LLILts h. respnnse e._ pnsitive rein FflT-DCI' d__ ennditiuned stimulus {CS} {L A rat is rein [mused I'm the first lever-pressing, mspun'su ‘1le occurs. on the JVETEEIE. after fifl seen—unis. Which schedule is the rat nn'.‘ :1. FR h. VR _ F] 5!. w TI‘. when the rat presses :1 [even [11;- mild e1ectrie shock on the, cage lien-r is mrnsd Off. fisfiuming the rat now her presses more frequently, what procedure is being Lise-lilt-1 it. ponisinnent negative rein forcement c. discrimination [raining el. negative punishment ii. The contingencies are as follows: if the response (JEGLLTH‘ a stimulus is presented; ifthe retoonse does not occur. the stimulus is not presented. tinder this procedure the strength ofthc response eleereasres. What proeednre is being used? a. [aisitive reinforcement b. negative reinforcement is. [nisitive punishment :3. negative punishment __ 9. In terms ot'ttle traditions] view ot'eonditioning, research on conditioned taste oversion was surprising because h' a. there was a very ions; delay between C5 and UCE h_. the dislike ot'a [urtieaiar taste was opernntlv conditioned e. conditioning occurred to ail stimuli present when the food was consumed d. the sense oFtnstc scents to be relatively weak _ iii Ciassieai eonditieming is 3 type of learning in which a. resramses come In he controlled h}: their consequences in. an organism‘s responding is influenced by the observation of others' behavior e. an, organism engages in a response tha1 brings aversive stimuia1ion 1o an end _d. a neutral stimulus acquires the ahniiilgi.r to elicit a response that was originally elicited by another stimnins i l. liiilnn is four years old. and his parents want to teach him to say "please" and "thank you." The}- vriti he most successful in altering Dition's behavior it'ttiey use a. classical conditionng h. higher—order conditioning, c. non-Contingent reiniorcclllcnt :Kd: operant conditioning l2. Kyle: used to bring drawings home l'rorn her kindergarten class every day. and her parents would put the pictures on the rcfi'igcretor and tell Kyle: how nice the pictures were. [met]; her parents haven't been putting. her artwork on the refrigerator, and now Kylee has stopped bringing drawings home with her. This example illustrates the operant eonditinning nroeess eF a. punishment h. avoidance c. resismnce extinction ___ 13. 1itil-"hen Diana finished washing the supper dishes, he: motile:- gore her a doiinr. In this case. the dollar can he viewed as a if it tends. to Iiiano in the firture. a. discriminative reinroreer; washing. other things {such as clothes} 11. primary reinibrcer'. having an increased probability ot'washing the dishes _e_ negative reinforeer; hnvinga deeressed pro hahiliry orwashing Ihe dishes 31: secondanv reinforce: having an increased probability oi'washing the dishes H. A salesperson earns a commission for each item oi'elotliinp, she selis. Commission on the clothing sales is an esnni ple ot‘whieh type of reinForeement schedule? a. fixed-ratio h. variahlie-irllervai e. fixed-interns] d. variable-ratio 15. Hegaiiye reinforcement 21. is the removal of‘ an aversive eondition fttliowirtg a response h. weakens the proeeding behavior e rl is lite unset" ofan aversive condition Following a response worksiust the opposite to positive neint-‘oreem ent 16. Which ofthe [chewing starborn ean about punishment is meorreet'? a. Punishment may take the form oframm'al 01" F! TW'flrtliiis Stimulu-‘i- b. Punishment occurs whenever a response terminates an aversive eonditiou. e. Punishment may take the Form of giving aversive stimulation after a response. :1. Punishment. by definition. weakens preeetliog behavior. _____ ITI‘. Which ofthe foiluwirng terms does not refer to a hash: process ei'memory'?’ _s. . iueiesiott retrieval r. millage rl. eneoding i3_ Whinh til" the following stale-merth regarding sensory tttetttelry 1's Lena accurate? :3. information one be stored in sensory memory for oniy a fraction ol'a second. It. Sensory memory is the first eomponent oftite memory system. e. Sensory merrtury preserves nil in {urination according to the acoustic properties efthe stimulus. d. i-‘tensefl'sr memory can preserve information frem F1 wrists Elf-Ems”? mltdflliLiflfi tee-- visual. auditory). II}. Yen are ahsorheti in reading your psychology test when the phone rings. After talking on the phone. you ean't remember the iast thing you read. This information was lost from memory. because the plume conversation distmeted you from _ the information. a. sensory; perceiving b_ shorE-tenu.‘ rehearsing e. long-term: reh earsine, d. long-term: retrieving _ Iii. The ahiiity of‘poopie to "juggle" InFoJ-mation in working memory in order to reason and make deeisinns is the _ eumponent of working memory. a. eseeutiee eent'ro] system [1. rehearse] loop 1:. 1r'istnetl imagery d. soiletilalil: 2| _ _ new“ when new inf'm-m align impairstho reteniiun of previoust learned information. a. Kotroaetiye Uttert‘erenoe h. Proactive. interfereuee L'. Retrograde amnesia d. Anterogradt: amnesia 2.2. lMlen was. ream-t Li} traded to a new haskelbnli team. and. he is having a hard time reotemtterw ing all the new plays because he keeps using Lite plays from his [owner team. Allen‘s problems illustrate the eli‘eets of a. retroaetiye interferenee h. state-dependent forgetting. “E” proactive interference :3. memory reeonslruetion __ 23. Retrieval from long-Icon Tl'l-L'l:[l.i‘2|l:'}' is Ilfiuaih' hc51 when the infi'rrrnaliun has been adored at uhiL-It level of pro-ccfifiing? a. structural semantic *2." phonemic ll. ohuniting _ 2-1.. It is very easy to recall the name of your high fichooi because it her. heen suhjocLed to EItC'I-‘lii-H-‘e' Q5 dealt pmcessiug 1.1. clueilorirtg e. citunking -~—- Ii. rehearsal. ___ 25. Chunking is [he a. elaboration of int'onnxtion it: shon-tcmt tttemory for storage into itrng- term memory h. process: ofoassing information from sensory munmrj' to short-term memory c. :actuai storage pmcciis of infmaliun ill long-1:111] 111cm“? db} method n.an Lu increase the amount oF information um: can hold in short-term memory 2d. The pructss ot‘rnitking attributions about the origins of memories ifi refcnod to :35 «-_ a. rcaliiy monitoring ' h. atom-cc monitoring 1. bufi'cring d. a contraindication TIT. A measure requires subjects to reproduce information on their own without an? cues. Ia; recall tr. recognition #5. rolcaming d. reiteration __ '29.. According to interference theory _a_. peopic 1‘or=._.tc1 information ocean-tr. of cm-noctition I'mru other materiai h. forgetting is due to incfi'ectitrc encod i113 '- the principal eausc of forgetting Hhould lot: the pafisagt‘: oftirnc d. the wants that occur during the rotentnon interim] do not affect forgcuing not have To ho acquired through leaning are cailcd _ rcinl'oreera 29. It fleck of dust or dirt in your eye would cause [he :31: to product: tcarii automatically to wash the ohject out. What would the fleck oi'dust or dirt be labeled if it were part of a classical conditioning. experiment? . 51'; “LE ' iii IJCR I_'. [‘5 d. ER _ EU. in operant conditioning future hchavior depends on the _ of behavior in the present. a. cattotionai outcomes E; prediclability c. approptrateucss — d. consequences 31. Rciothrccro that are in mulch: rcinFot-cing bccouoc they Sfltifi f}- somc biological need and do g. Hawaiian; 11: primary Enlarg- d. sprrnmnmus __ 32. [fjfinlt give yum dug a dug biscuit every f'ifih Ilmc i'll: plays dead whaL rein finmnmcnt sgljsduis is the do],- um? a; fixed ralip 13. fixed illlcrsal :. varia his Iaiicl d. suriahll: inTL'nu'aJ A. child is. rsinlbrsed first fur manipulating hooks. then for [puking through thum. ncxr For mat-ling. Shun: briefly, and [EL-:1 I'm reading Him: for image: perisds. This PTl'lC-L'L'IIII'C Is an sxample of a. Sandman-e appmximatiuns. b. shaping. s. classical mnditinning. 'Hulh a and I} ; 234. in positive :sinl’crcernum Lumtll'ling i5 . In negati‘n'e reitLJ-urucrntnl Humcthing is added; summstud 'E. subtrsulsd: xddud LL. rewardcd: punished d. punifihsri: rewarded “I. 1:: our ol'a‘tnup's Ethics. 21 1mg.- whn is guarding sheep bsmmss lbs-red and silmuis "wull' " in amuse The luwnspuuplu. Thu townspeople some to the boy‘s aid only in find it a prank. 'I'hs tun}- continues [:3 crusasicmally shout " WDH' ". hm manually 1hr: pflapls slap coming. 'I'Etcir rcspouss has bush 3. minthroed. b. mudslcfl. i:._. gtlttralizud. d. sxlinguishud. 3E). Spunmnuuus runner}- uan msur unly during classical s:uwfi1iuniug_ nniy during opsan sun ditiuning. during, but}: "permit 3an classical extiusiion. during hull]: Hlfrrtllilh' gtnsrnliarnriun and discrimination. 3?. Vifllmily 3” IIW infom'aatisn being taken in by uur ssnsss appears Tc- be held for a r|:|I_"p|:|:|_t':r.|l in a type nf memory Ems-rm 215 '-:'-'" F sure il. cugniiivc rncrnnry. p. episodic manners. LC: Lin: stilwry men-I pry 11. working msmnr}. 33. Vntir msmsry for your tenth birthday is said in be stored in 31, Stliialltiu mum-:11}: h_ episodic msmor}. pru-cudurai mtchQ'. d shun—term memory. 39. Jfi'su have II:- Ina-marin- a long poem in French. 31m will prphahly haw: Inc-5t :ijflicuifi with the her: mm: of the effect. 1!: Iiiiddicg .‘im‘ifli prisilipn b. middis; Splmding utlii- aiiuu c. cud; serial pm iTinn :1 beginning; aprtmling activation in. “(nu an: unah'lc [u mincmber your pmvipus address. because :r'liilLl [and [Li cmd'use it u'ith your Egan address: U1i5 illustraa‘cs intchcrcnct. {fly rain-active h. retrograde c. prnactivc d. mutix-illcd 41 _ Accnrd'ing Ln mum-med forgenjng thmry. which [fiat 111' uxpt‘riunu: is IllusL iikelj' to be l'tJIgLI-llunr.’ a. a meal cxpul‘icn L1: 1:. a happyr occasion __ it: an! upficfling experitmcu: Id. 3 childhapd experience...
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