Personality disorders Lecture notes

Personality disorders Lecture notes - Personality Disorders...

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Personality Disorders Think for a minute about some high school acquaintances or people that you currently know now in college that have personalities that make them stand out…but perhaps not always in a good way. Was there a “space ball”, someone who didn’t seem to make sense, often wore strange outfits, and perhaps often responded in appropriately during conversations? Or perhaps a “drama queen”, whose theatrics and exaggerated emotions turn everything into a big deal? Or even perhaps a “neat freak”, who had the perfectly organized locker/dorm room, precisely arranged hair, and a sweater with absolutely no lint? We already discussed that one way to describe people is to say they have “personality”, the unique patterns of traits we already explored. However, personalities can become so rigid and defining that these unique personality traits start to blend in mental disorders. The DSM refers to these as personality disorders and are defined as “deeply ingrained, inflexible patterns of thinking, feeling, relating to others, or controlling impulses that cause distress of impaired functioning”. The thing is that people with personality disorders may not perceive that there is anything wrong with their behavior and are often not motivated to change it. One should never rush to judgment and shouldn’t expect to see zebras when they hear hooves beating…sometimes it is just a common horse. Most of the personality types we listed above can be quite healthy… but when it starts to become a burden or harmful (to themselves or others), then it is cause for concern. According to the DSM, there are 10 different personality disorders (schizotypal, paranoid, schizoid, antisocial, borderline, histrionic, narcissistic, avoidant, dependent, and obsessive compulsive). For this class, we are going to focus on the most dramatic. Borderline Personality Disorder According to the DSM-IV, to be diagnosed with borderline personality disorder, a person must show an enduring pattern of behavior that includes at least five of the following symptoms: 1) Extreme reactions (i.e. panic, depression, rage, or frantic actions) to abandonment (real or perceived) 2)
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