Major Concepts Exam 4 - MAJOR CONCEPTS UNIT:1 EXAM Chapter...

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 1

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
Image of page 3

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: MAJOR CONCEPTS: UNIT :1 EXAM Chapter 13 Social Psychology {If it's in BOLD TYPE. then KNOW IT} NOTE: “Compare and oontrast" "teens to define and explain similarities and differences between tennsioonoepts Etta!!! 13 '1. Define social psychology. Define and describe social cognition Social psychology- area of psychology that focuses on honr people thinlr about other people and interact in relationships and groups- Social cognition- how peopie peroeive the social world and how may attend to, store, remember, and use into about other people and the social world. 2. Define attitudes. Describe the three components of attitudes. IConsider hm attimdes may affect cognition and behavior. What characteristics of attibides are most likely to affect behavior? How might behavior, in turn, affect attitudes? Attihtdes-anyflting you form and opinion on. 3 components of attitudes affective lien-lotion}. behavioral {how you treat 'H‘ifl ideaiperson}. and cognitive {what you think you know}- Strong attitude- all 3 components are in line. 3. Define cognitive dissonance and describe hov.I it results in attitude mange? Consider examples as discussed in class Cognitive Dissonanoe— The state of anxiety when your thoughts and feelings related to an attitude are different than your behaviors. Humans alroost always change our thoughts and feelings to be consistent with our behaviors. EX: Guy 1irrlho is health nut works at a job where he has to mariret kids cereal- instead of quitting job, he changed his thou-gifts and feelings. He actually started to like and eat the cereal. Eli: waiting to sit down at a rest-aunts; food it just average. due to the wait you mind convinces itself it was actually better. 4. Define persuasion. Compare and contrast the central route and peripheral route. examples of each. Dmon'be the mere exposure effect. Be familiar with stereoteriatics of persuasive people and persuasive messages Fersuasion- any effort to change someone‘s attitude; goal of politics, marketing. and advertising. Central vs pen' pherai route- Gentral route is using logic and reason to persuade someone. Peripheral route invoives ND logic or reason: it invotves §q¥LflrflflfiDfl, celebrities, and gimmicks. Best Peripheral route of persuasion is a message arousing strong emotions such as FEAR. Mere exposure effect- the more exposure, the more you begin to like it. Elli: vote for candidate you see more signsicommercials for. 5. Define and describe stereotypes. Consider examples. What cognitive srrors can stereotyping lead to? Stereotypes are beliefs about people from a particular category- not necessarily. They are cognitive shortcuts. Stereotypes on prohssions such as doctors are often wrong. Most basic stereotype- us or them. E. Coopers and contrast prejudice and discrimination. Consider examples of each. How are stereotypes and prejudice related? Stereotypes: can be negative, positive, or neutral. Belief of set of beliefs about people from a particular category. Prejudice and discriminate are almost always negative. Prejudice- attitude Discrimination behavior 1'. Compare and contrast the three primary theories of prejudice development: realistic conflict titeery— prejudice comes as a result of competition and scarce resources, social catcgerizatien- every time we meet someone we categorize them as like us or not like usI social learning theory-you learn your prejudice through culture, from your generation and community. Describe the Robbers Car-re study and know which theory listed here it is tied to. Compare and contrast ingreup-categorizing people based on if they are 'rn" such as sorority and fraternity and outgreuprnct like us and consider examples of each. We tend to view members of the ingroup much more fairerly than we do members of the pulp roup“**““itobbers says study— group of boys mat randomly assigned members of that group to two different tnbes. Had tn'bes engage in athletic competrhon. After a couple of days: the boys formed strong prejudices against each other because they were fighting tor resources 3. Compare and contrast the three primary ways of changing {decreasing} prejudice: contact hypothesis-the more you have contact with people you have prejudice against, the less you 'oecorne prejudice because you start to iilte them and realize that your poor beliefs aren’t necessarily true, recategorization, mutual interdependence. Describe the “jigsaw classroom”. 9. Define ath‘ihuticns. Explanation for the cause of an event of behavior. intercessor you rotnass something happening to someone: we are genetically wired to make an explanation for the causes of the events. Compare and contrast internal {dispositienelj mundane—explain a person’s behavior in tonne of that person‘s characteristics. blame someone for their own set of circumstances example] someone did bad on. exam—they are a bed student. in a car accident--—t_hey don‘t how to drive, itis their fault, someone wins lottery—that guy really pissed those numbers rig ht. he earned that money and external [simaticnal] attributions-lite environment, example} the professor sucks: that's why you got bad grade. Got in car accident—the roads were wet or someone distracted them. won the lottery—just pure tuck. Consider enencles of each of these 1D. Describe ath'ibutional biases. Describe the fundamental attribution mar icorreependenee biasj-rnost common cognitive error ait hornan bEtHQS matte-specific to situations which you are observing the behavior oi others- -— strong tendency to interpret others hehayior as caused by internal factors. omen anything happens to anyone else as always their fault, the self—serving bias- autornatic inclination to attribute cne's failures to external causes: exarnpiej cu fail an exam. you automaticaliy blame the environment-nicchir'g for someone else to blame, BUT you contribute your successes to Internal and Late: full credit, and belief in a just world. Consider explanations for these mental errors as well as examples of each x. .— see“.— ;~—_--—- 3. I'_-' wt.- l.- a't'actiyc 5 _ -; """'-‘i_:_.-:._. .. L'. i'_'-._.._.: _..._I': ..._ s g-eator. Consider examples of each 12. Compare and contrast passionate toys:- o.‘ and a' c .: Site eyer. :3... arose . and oompanionato toys-r _ . connection. . Consider cultural variations in the emphasis on these as a prerequisite for marriage as discussed in class. Describe Sternberg's triangular model of one-paseéc-r to 5.".‘:§.'3“3te to commitment. Ele generally familiar with how infant—parent attachment styles relate to adult [eye relationships and consider examples 13. Describe the evolutionary theory of the deyeloprnent of mating preferences. Describe gender differences in mating preferences. How might changing roles {especially for women] and changers in culture affect mating preferences? t4. Define and describe a group-E ._-.- coco-e the: here sci-refining. i': comma-rt. Compare and contrast norms—and roles in groups. Consider examples of each. Describe Zimbardo's Stanford Prison Experimont and describe the implication for role-oriented behayior in prison and other settings. ‘15. Define confonn‘rty and consider examples. Compare and contrast informational social influence and normative social influence. Describe Solomon Asch’s line study of conformity and explain how group size and group unanimity may affect likelihood of oonfomtity as discussed in class. How did deception play a role in this study? How might individualistic and oollectiuistic cultures differ to their level of conformity? to. Define obedience and consider examples. Describe Stanley Milgram's shock study of obedience and discuss the sociohistoricai context of the study as discussed in class [why did Miigrarn and the world become interested in this?}. Be sure to differentiate between “teacher” and "learner’= in the study. How strong of a social influence was an authority figure found to be? How did deception play a role in this smdy? tnlhat percentage of participants 1were first expected to and later obseryed to administer the maximum level of shock? What factors were directly related to obedience among subjects in these studies? lL‘Jorlsider the effects of this study on participants “relic-1c:- “p. I ._.._.._- - . with" Hana-— IEI't-u-‘i-i) : _ discussed in class, people maybe-hays quite differently in groups. Consider explanations and examples for why this occurs related to each of the following concepts group polarization, groupfl-iink, deindiyiduation. social loafing. . a... a. :- _:'. .. . “u . n .._. .114: more EXIEITE FSsT 3:312:31":- . n I = a. 1a.“.- .-v.- a 1-H“.— r Grout. i.,-c:ar.za..cn- -.-..-==-jenc;.- a. Mr re... .. group GtSUQ-EEEDFES Iil'i'i-isteirer the majority opinion is before discussion becomes the overafl opinion afterwards. Best example: Juries. Groupthio's a group otctoee individuals (friends. team, sorority} will sacrifice logic and critical analysts to promote group cohesion. Lack of critical analysis; example of group- thinle. safest gangs. Another example of group think: NASA Deirdi-ndoation'. loss of sense of self. Explanation for riots and roots. gm-ai ggafing; freewading; redudicn in indiuiduai effort because you belie-re the wort: is spreacI among the group. 13. Descnhe hmnr the bystander effect relates to bystander intervention. Define ditheion of responsibility and be familiar with the relationship of these terms to the Kitty Genoirese ease. Consider examples of these terms rl'rliaision of resp- me last: of helping people; diminished sense of responsibility oi helping it other people are arouno. Bystander- decrease in otters ot assistance when the number of bystandeis witnessing an event increases. ‘19. Be familiar with the ethical concerns of social psychological research. How does deception relate to psychological harm? 'iM-iat limitations are plaoecl on current studies involving deoeption? Cant dBGEWE people. There are wise and ethics. Can't do it to the point ot psyo harm. ...
View Full Document

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern