GelElectrophoresisMeasuremtInstructionsSpring2015Bb

GelElectrophoresisMeasuremtInstructionsSpring2015Bb - HOW...

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HOW TO MEASURE AND USE THE DATA FROM YOUR GEL—UPDATED SPRING 2015 In order to identify a band on a gel by its weight, it is necessary to know the expected size of the band you are looking for. To identify gfp gene, you need to know the molecular weight. Check your lab manual, step e. It states that the gfp gene is in the 750bp vicinity. The Molecular Weight Standards (MWS) provide reference points which can be used to calculate the size of the band on your gel. Please note the photo of the gel given as an example below that shows the sizes of each of the bands in the MWS. You may notice that some bands are much closer together than others despite having a much larger size difference. This is because smaller fragments travel through the gel exponentially faster than larger fragments. Measure and work with your own gel and the PROMEGA ladder standard shown in your lab manual. Below is an example using a Promega G5711 Ladder of Molecular Weight Standard. INCLUDE A COPY OF YOUR GEL AS A FIGURE, AND THE PROMEGA STDS LADDER AS ANOTHER FIGURE, IN YOUR LAB REPORT. GIVE THEM THEIR OWN FIGURE # AND TITLE. Here is the Promega G5711 Ladder of Molecular Weight Standards: Wells are at this end: __ __ __ __ __ __ * The dye front will be at THIS end!* The primers you were given are to flank the gfp , not the ampicillin resistance gene! (The ampicillin
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