Lab 07 - Moments of Inertia

Lab 07 - Moments of Inertia - James Maltese Rebecca Rideout...

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James Maltese Rebecca Rideout Rachel Matyisin Derek Mitchell Austin Jacobs Lab Experiment 7 PART I – Moment of Inertia
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Lab Meeting: Tuesdays 11:00am-1:00pm Purpose The purpose of this laboratory experiment is to test and study a rigid-bodies rotation around a moving  axis. The experiment will attempt to show the difference between a stationary object and the particles  of that object. The experiment should demonstrate the difference between translational motion and  rotational motion. Theory The kinetic energy of an object is associated with its motion through space. An object rotating about a  fixed axis remains stationary in space, so there is no kinetic energy associated with translational  motion. The individual particles making up the rotating object, however, are moving through space;  they following a circular path. Therefore, there is kinetic energy associated with rotational motion. The  total kinetic energy of the rotating rigid object is then measured as the kinetic energies of all of the  individual particles. We describe the moment of inertia as the name given to rotational inertia, the rotational analog of  mass for linear motion. The moment of inertia must be specified with respect to a chosen axis of  rotation. It is expressed with the following equation: = I imiri2 . Using this equation, the expression  for rotational kinetic energy can be described with:  = Kr 12Iw2 . Question You race various round rigid bodies by releasing them from rest at the top of an inclined plane   (FIG.- 2). What shape or size should a rigid body have to reach the bottom of the inclined plane first? ANSWER:  If the moments of inertia can be expressed by the equation = I cMR2  then the  speed depends on the value of c. The smaller the value of c the faster the object will be moving at any 
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single point on the way down the ramp. Therefore, solid spheres in this experiment should be the first  to reach the bottom because they have the smallest value of c. Calculations
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This lab report was uploaded on 04/15/2008 for the course PHY 2048 taught by Professor Guzman during the Spring '08 term at FAU.

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Lab 07 - Moments of Inertia - James Maltese Rebecca Rideout...

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