Ch._1_Campus_Net_&_Design_Models

Ch._1_Campus_Net_&_Design_Models - Otero Junior College...

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Unformatted text preview: Otero Junior College Cisco Networking Academy Overview of the Campus Network and Design Models Chapter 1 Otero Junior College Otero Junior College The term campus network derives from networks built on university campuses. Today, the term is used more broadly to include networks that span corporate "campuses. Historically, campus networks consisted of a single LAN to which new users were added simply by connecting anywhere on the LAN. Because of distance limitations of the networking media, campus networks usually were confined to a building or several buildings in close proximity to each other Traditional Campus Networks Otero Junior College Otero Junior College Issues The two major problems with traditional networks have always been availability and performance. These two problems are both impacted by the amount of bandwidth available. Traffic that can affect network performance: Broadcast - traffic that polls the network about component status or availability and advertises network component status or availability Multicast - traffic that is propagated to a specific group of users Otero Junior College Otero Junior College Broadcast Issue Solutions Two methods can address the broadcast issue for large switched LAN sites. The first option is to use routers to create many subnets and logically segment the traffic (Broadcasts do not pass through routers). Problem: although this approach will contain broadcast traffic, the CPU of a traditional router will have to process each packet. This scenario can create a bottleneck in the network. A second option would be to implement virtual LANs (VLANs) within the switched network Otero Junior College Otero Junior College Traditional 80/20 Rule The 80/20 rule states that in a properly designed network, 80 percent of the traffic on a given network segment is local. No more than 20 percent of the network traffic should move across the backbone of the network. Otero Junior College...
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This note was uploaded on 04/09/2008 for the course CS 210 taught by Professor Pratchett during the Spring '06 term at ECPI College of Technology.

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Ch._1_Campus_Net_&_Design_Models - Otero Junior College...

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