Lecture 8 & 9 - The Pennsylvania State University...

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Unformatted text preview: The Pennsylvania State University Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering Lectures 8 and 9: Introduction to Geometric Design and Horizontal Alignment (Part 1) CE 321: Highway Engineering Fall 2007 Introduction to Geometric Design Geometric Design Policy Functional Classification Design Vehicles Traffic Characteristics A Policy on Geometric Design of Highways and Streets, 2004 Published by: American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO) Known as the Green Book Geometric Design Policy Functional Classification of Roadways Series of travel movements: Main movement (high-speed flow) Transition Distribution Collection Access Termination (parked vehicle) All six stages not necessary Maintain identifiable order Hierarchy of Movement Source: A Policy on Geometric Design Of Highways and Streets, AASHTO, 2004. Functional Classification of Roadways Each hierarchy stage should intersect with facilities of the next higher or lower classification. Stages needed to satisfy spacing needs and traffic volume demands. Functional classification is grouping of highways and streets according to the service they are intended to provide. Functional Classification of Roadways AASHTOs criteria recognizes two functions provided by streets and highways: Mobility Access These two functions conflict. Relationship of Functionally Classified Systems in Service Traffic Mobility and Land Access Source: A Policy on Geometric Design Of Highways and Streets, AASHTO, 2004. Functional Classification of Roadways Characteristics of Functional Systems Urbanized areas have populations of 50,000 or more Small urban areas have populations between 5,000 and 50,000 Rural areas are those not considered urban areas. Functional Classification of Roadways Rural System: Rural Principal Arterial Interconnect larger urban areas (statewide or interstate travel) Operating speeds typically > 55 mph Rural Minor Arterial Attract travel over large distances from cities, larger towns, and other traffic generators High travel speeds with nominal through interference Operating speeds typically 40 to 55 mph Rural Principal Arterial Rural Minor Arterial Rural Roadways Rural Facilities: Rural Collectors Serve short intra-country trips Operating speeds typically 30 to 40 mph Rural Local Roads Provide access to adjacent land Operating speeds typically < 25 mph Rural Collector...
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This note was uploaded on 04/11/2008 for the course C E 321 taught by Professor Pietrucha,martinkeller,michaelwi during the Spring '07 term at Pennsylvania State University, University Park.

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Lecture 8 & 9 - The Pennsylvania State University...

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