Japanese Painting Study Guide

Japanese Painting Study Guide - Japanese Painting Study...

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Japanese Painting Study Guide I. Rise of Yamato-E, 8 th – 12 th century: a style of Japanese painting that takes place during the late Heian period; the Japanese are under the strong influence of Chinese culture during the Tang’s dynasty, which was the most highly developed civilization at that time; often tells narrative themes with text alongside the painting, focus on landscape and the four seasons. A. Kichijoten (Nara Period) – Mahayana Buddhist goddess usually shown in kara-e; found in Nara and Heian-era temples; it has a naturalistic figure, distinguished facial expressions, and occupies most of the frame space. B. Byodoin Door paintings (1053) – set of wooden doors found in the Byodo-in (Phoenix Hall), which is a Buddhist temple that was founded by the Fujiwara family; depicts the nine grades of rebirth into a pureland; when you are reborn in the aristocrats’ vision of Western paradise, it is not the same for everyone; the size of welcoming depends on your conduct on earth; sutra is written out on the doors, which shows how the Japanese are creating their own vocabulary in landscape painting.
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C. Taira Sutra Scrolls painted by Taira women– created in the late Heian period, 1164, on highly decorative paper by the Taira family; frontispiece has a Lotus Sutra painting and a Chapter of Lotus Sutra is written (although the frontispiece does not illustrate the text), which shows that reading the sutra was not as important as having it written; the sutras portray signs of prestige such as the beauty of the hair and kimonos D. Tale of Genji painted by Takekawa– first extensive writing to be done in Japanese (1000); devised a syllabary to help them write grammatical Japanese, which was taken over by the women of the court to write literary Japanese; the faces from the Tale of Genji carry little facial expression, very little characteristics to distinguish the characters from one another, much simplified and highly abstracted; faces are turned in different directions such as the men’s face b/c they were not supposed to face the women unless it was immediate family or his wife; man is compartmentalized.
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Azumaya: intimate domestic scene; viewer has privileged access but isn’t acknowledged; sliding door hints a sense of movement; the vertical screen draws attention towards the women being pampered Composition can be used as an expressive device; flutes symbolize melancholy associated with autumn; screens and walls play important elements such as separating the room into different stories; white symbolizes the color of mourning. II. Development of Narrative Handscrolls A. Tale of Genji scrolls: Japanese writing was considered as the woman language, which composed poems, diaries, and novels B. Legends of Mt. Shigi – popular in late Heian and succeeding Kamakura period; first two scrolls illustrate Myoren’s (the monk who found the temple Chogosonshiji; leaves his family at a young age to study Buddhism in Nara) miracles; last scroll illustrates his sister, a
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Japanese Painting Study Guide - Japanese Painting Study...

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