FD wal-mart--the survival of the fittest

FD wal-mart--the survival of the fittest - Survival of the...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–3. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Survival of the Fittest 1 Kristin Chen Professor Peine World Inc 10/1/2007 Wal-Mart—The Survival of the Fittest “Save Money. Live Better.” Wal-Mart’s new slogan clearly captures the company’s corporate attitude and vision: to provide the best possible prices to its customers while protecting the environment. In the 21 st century, a time of globalization and innovation, it comes as no surprise that Wal-Mart is the most powerful and most influential company in the world. Wal- Mart has re-defined efficiency, re-defined our perception of low prices, and even revolutionized the entire retail industry. Instead of exploiting customers for profit, Wal-Mart focuses on minimizing production and shipping costs and also uses its colossal influence to establish more efficient standards of production for the entire industry. Even though some companies suffer because they are unable to compete with this corporation, Wal-Mart is beneficial for society on a local scale, protecting lower income families from inflation; a national scale, improving national production and shipping, and a global scale, redefining the global standards of efficiency. Although Wal-Mart has changed the very ecosystem and rhythm of business, “often with devastating consequences for those who couldn’t adjust” (Fishman, 2007), the corporation has created new standards that have pushed other businesses to maximize efficiency. John Mariotti, a veteran of the consumer product world and ex-CEO of Huffy Bicycle Co., states that “Wal- Mart has done more good for America by several thousand orders of magnitude than they’ve done bad … they have raised the bar, and raised the bar for everyone”. To demonstrate Wal- Mart’s positive impact on other employers, Mariotti references a situation where he was duty- bound to supply Wal-Mart, and therefore conceded business to his competitors. Because he had
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Survival of the Fittest 2 to maximize his capacity to fulfill Wal-Mart’s order for cheap bikes, he gave rival manufacturers his designs for four of his higher end and higher margin products (Fishman 2003). Pressured to appease Wal-Mart, Mariotti not only relinquished profits, but surrendered them to his competitors. Still, Mariotti states, “Wal-Mart didn’t tell me what to do [and] they didn’t have to” (Fishman, 2003). He expresses his respect for the corporation asserting that the corporation “is as tough as nails. But they give you a chance to compete. If you can’t compete, that’s your problem” (Fishman, 2003). Likewise, Peter Campanella, former head of Corning Kitchenware products, sustains a similarly high-opinion of Wal-Mart’s unusual fundamental integrity declaring that “they are tough people but very honest; they treat you honestly. It was a joke to do business with most of their competitors. A fiasco” (Fishman, 2003). Furthermore, Robin Prever, CEO of Saratoga Beverage Group, maintains the same comparable admiration for Wal-Mart. He
Background image of page 2
Image of page 3
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 02/14/2008 for the course D SOC 111 taught by Professor Peine,emelie during the Spring '08 term at Cornell.

Page1 / 6

FD wal-mart--the survival of the fittest - Survival of the...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 3. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online