February_19th - PLS 320 AMERICAN JUDICIAL PROCESS Judicial Decision-Making In This Presentation The The The The Purpose of Decision-Making Models

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    PLS 320: AMERICAN JUDICIAL PROCESS Judicial Decision-Making
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    In This Presentation The Purpose of Decision-Making Models The Legal Model The Attitudinal Model The Rational Choice Model
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    Qualitative or Quantitative Analysis The Primary Question in Any Scientific Research, Apart  From How Do We Formulate Our Theories, Is How Do We  Measure and Test Phenomena Related to Our Theory. Qualitative Analysis or Thick Description, Usually Focused  on Words or Symbols, Is Designed to Explain a Great Deal  About a Small Number of Observations.  Commonly, This  is Approach Uses Case Studies.  This is the Usual  Approach in the Legal Community. Quantitative Analysis Employs Numbers, Statistics, and  Models to Make Comparisons Across A Large Number of  Observations.
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    What are Models? Models Simplify a World that is Too Complex to  Understand Completely and in its Entirety. No Model is a Perfect Representation. Models Facilitate Research By Allowing Us to Predict  What Will Happen.  If What is Expected to Happen,  Does Happen, Then It is Evidence For the Model. Either Qualitative or Quantitative Analysis Can Be  Used With Modeling.
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    What Do Models of Judicial Decision- Making Try To Predict or Explain? Models Could Try To Predict The Outcome of Specific  Cases. Models Could Try To Predict How Individual Justices Will  Vote. Models Could Try To Explain The Factors That Go Into the  Each Decision or Decisions in General. Models Could Use The Supreme Court to Test Broader  Decision-Making Theory. When You Think of Models, Think of Airplanes: Model  Airplanes (Either Gas-Powered or Plastic Without Real  Engines, or Paper Airplanes)
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    How Judges Decide Cases Perhaps, The Most Important Thing to Understand  About An Institution is Its Output. Four Common Explanations: 1. The Legal Model 2. The Attitudinal Model 3. The Rational Choice Model 4. The Political Model
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  The Legal Model o “The Decisions of the Court are Substantially  Influenced by the  Facts of The Case , in Light of  the Plain Meaning of Statutes and the Constitution,  the Intent of the Framers and/or Precedent.” (Segal  and Spaeth 2002, pg 48).   o But is this Really a Predictive Model, Or is it More  Properly an Approach Used By Judges to Minimize  Their Bias? o
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This note was uploaded on 04/13/2008 for the course PLS 320 taught by Professor Snook during the Spring '08 term at Michigan State University.

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February_19th - PLS 320 AMERICAN JUDICIAL PROCESS Judicial Decision-Making In This Presentation The The The The Purpose of Decision-Making Models

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