{[ promptMessage ]}

Bookmark it

{[ promptMessage ]}

March_25th - PLS 320 AMERICAN JUDICIAL PROCESS Testing...

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–6. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
    PLS 320: AMERICAN JUDICIAL PROCESS Testing Rosenberg Brown v. Board of Education  and Civil  Rights in the United States
Image of page 1

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
    In This Presentation o Brown v. Bd. Of Education  (1954) o Using Civil Rights to Test Rosenberg’s  Assertions o Impressions and Reality of Judicial Impact o Selecting Your Groups
Image of page 2
    Brown v. Bd. Of Education  (1954) First argued in 1952, then re-argued in 1953, it was a  consolidation of four cases involving educational segregation in  primary and secondary schools in four different states— Brown  being the first alphabetically. Bolling v. Sharpe  (1954) was a companion case involving school  segregation in the District of Columbia. The case was national in scope, effecting school segregation  across the country. And thus fits Rosenberg’s criteria for  importance. The case was an important break with previous understandings of  the law in popular culture.  It is almost impossible to hear of the  case, without hearing the term “Landmark” first.  
Image of page 3

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
    Brown v. Bd. Of Education  (1954) The decision was unanimous (9-0) in favor of ending public  school segregation. The decision did not include a remedy, which was  postponed until a later re-hearing. The remedy phase of the decision (often called  Brown II was announced on May 31, 1955. The decision commanded lower courts to “enter such  orders and decrees consistent with this opinion as are  necessary and proper to admit to public schools on a  racially nondiscriminatory basis with  all deliberate speed   the parties to these cases” ( Brown II  1955, cited in  Rosenberg)
Image of page 4
    Immediate Effects Rosenberg says there are few immediate effects.
Image of page 5

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 6
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern