January_17th - PLS 320: AMERICAN JUDICIAL PROCESS A....

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    PLS 320: AMERICAN JUDICIAL PROCESS A. CRIMINAL PROCEDURE B. THE CONSTITUTION and CRIMINAL  PROCEDURE C. PLEA BARGAINING AND SENTENCING
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    In This Presentation AN OVERVIEW OF CRIMINAL COURTS  AND CRIMINAL CASES STAGES OF FORMAL ACTION in  FELONY CASES THE CONSTITUTION and CRIMINAL  PROCEDURE PLEA BARGAINING SENTENCING
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    What is a Criminal Case? Criminal Cases  1. Cases in which the government charges people with  offense that are punishable upon conviction 2. Some violations of law result in both criminal and civil  cases (both to punish the offense and to compensate  victims) 3. Cases result from violations of statutes passed by  legislatures or (sometimes) government regulations
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    Types of Cases Capital—a term meaning any major crime punishable by  death (one where someone could lose their “head.”) Felonies—the most major offenses, usually punishable by  confinement to state or federal prison for the period of one  or more years Misdemeanors—minor cases often involving small or  moderate fines, but could entail jail time up to one year Juvenile Offenses—cases committed by non-adults,  although the legal definition of adulthood varies from case  to case and crime to crime.
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    Participants in a Criminal Trials Trial Court Judges—are usually both Presiders and  Finders of Fact.  In some states, judges specialize in  criminal cases. Prosecuting Attorneys—represent the government in  bringing a case against an individual(s) or corporation(s).   Prosecutors have a great deal of discretion in bringing  cases and/or resolving them. Defense Attorneys—represent defendants in court and in  plea bargaining.  In major criminal cases, defendants have  a right to counsel and will have a lawyer assigned to them,  if they can not afford one.
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    Participants (2) Clerk of Courts—a public official who schedules and arranges cases.
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January_17th - PLS 320: AMERICAN JUDICIAL PROCESS A....

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