January_24th - PLS 320: AMERICAN JUDICIAL PROCESS Judicial...

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    PLS 320: AMERICAN JUDICIAL PROCESS Judicial Selection II:  The Confirmation Process
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    In This Presentation HOW DOES SOMEONE BECOME A  FEDERAL JUDGE DISTRICT COURTS COURTS OF APPEALS THE U.S. SUPREME COURT OTHER FEDERAL COURTS AND  MAGISTRATES
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    The Nomination Process—Basics   1. Formally, the President nominates federal judges and “by  and with the advice and consent” of the Senate” appoints  (U.S. Constitution, Article II, Section 2, paragraph 2). 2. This means that the Senate must approve the nomination  by a majority vote. 3. In practice, things are more complicated.  The President  does not personally know all of the people he appoints. 4. The Senate is not required to confirm nominees (or even to  consider them). 
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    The Nomination Process—From the  President’s Perspective The President has Several Goals in  Nominating Judges. 1. Policy Preferences 2. Pursuit of Political Support 3. Rewarding Supporters and Friends 4. Finding Qualified People 5. Seeking or Avoiding Conflict with Opponents
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    Where Do Nominees Come From? Senators make Recommendations, especially for  District Court Judges. Interest Groups make Recommendations Assistant Attorney General for the Office of Legal  Policy usually Makes a List and Vet (scrutinizes)  Each President Sets Up a Unique System, but the  Attorney General, White House Counsel, and White  House Chief of Staff are Usually Involved.
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  The Confirmation Process from The  Senate’s Perspective Senator’s Can Usually Block Nominations to District Courts within  Their Home State, especially if they are a Member of the President’s  Party. Nominations are Referred to the Committee on the Judiciary (the  Judiciary Committee). The Judiciary Committee Can (if it wants) Hold Hearings on  Nominees. In almost all cases, a Nominee must be Approved by a Judiciary  Committee Vote, in order to Reach the Senate “Floor” for  Consideration by the Entire Senate. The Senate Majority Leader May (if he or she wants) Bring a 
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This note was uploaded on 04/13/2008 for the course PLS 320 taught by Professor Snook during the Spring '08 term at Michigan State University.

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January_24th - PLS 320: AMERICAN JUDICIAL PROCESS Judicial...

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