Chapter 7 - Chapter 7 Security and the Law Security, Public...

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Chapter 7 Security and the Law
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Security, Public Police and the U.S. Constitution The public police have greater powers than do security personnel to arrest, detain, search and interrogate. Security personnel are generally limited to the exercise of powers possessed by every citizen. There is NO legal area where the position of a security officer as such confers any greater rights, powers, or privileges than those possessed by every other citizen.
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Criminal and Civil Law Criminal Law: Deals with offenses against society (corporations are of course part of society and can be either criminals or victims). Every state has its criminal code that classifies and defines criminal offenses. When criminal offenses are brought into court, the state takes an active part, considering itself to be the offended party. Civil Law: Deals with the personal relations and conflicts between individuals, corporations and government agencies.
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Private Security Powers: Detention Detention differs from arrest in that it permits a merchant to detain a suspected shoplifter briefly without turning the suspect over to the police. In most states security can detain a suspected shoplifter for a
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Chapter 7 - Chapter 7 Security and the Law Security, Public...

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