Week 5 - Leivick drama pcs (2)

Week 5 - Leivick drama pcs (2) - Halpern Leivick 1888-1962...

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Yiddish poet. A Bundist since 1902, he was arrested in 1906 for distributing illegal literature. After spending four years in prisons in St. Petersburg and Moscow, where he wrote several books in Yiddish, he was exiled in 1911 to the village of Vitim near the Lena River. He escaped in the summer of 1913 and later immigrated to the USA . 1 Halpern Leivick 1888-1962
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2 The establishment of the Bund was the outcome of an encounter between the new Jewish working class and a group of young Jewish intelligentsia who were attracted to various forms of Marxism and socialism. The Bund was the largest political party supporting the Tsentrale Yidishe Shul Organizatsye (TSYSHO or CYSHO; Central Yiddish School Organization) school network, which had facilities in more than 100 communities and was also supported by the Left Po‘ale Tsiyon party. Instruction was in Yiddish, with secular and socialist orientation guiding the values taught to the students. By the early 1920s, TSYSHO included at least 69 schools and 30 kindergartens. In 1928–1929, the system embraced 46 kindergartens, 114 elementary schools, 52 evening schools, 3 secondary schools, and a seminary for training teachers. More than 24,000 students attended TSYSHO institutions. In 1926, the Bund also built the Vladimir Medem Sanatorium, originally a facility for children in danger of contracting tuberculosis but soon expanded to include other children. The children were organized into a collective that provided them with independence as they governed their own social and cultural activities. During the summer months the numbers reached about 350. The Bund also played a central role in the development of Jewish newspapers in Russia and Poland. Before 1917, most of its Russian and Yiddish publications were illegal, though as early as 1896 Vladimir Kossovskii had begun to edit Der yidisher arbeter in Vilna. After World War I a turning point was reached in newly independent Poland, with the Bund sponsoring a rich variety of publications on the national and local levels. The reading matter included articles about politics, culture, and sports; other journals were aimed at a young readership. The main newspaper was the Folks-tsaytung, which appeared in various forms and titles from 1920 to the outbreak of World War II; beginning in the 1930s it occasionally published special sections for female workers. A parallel Polish-language newspaper, Głos Bundu, was also published during the same period. web 01/02/2015
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3 Faust (German for "fist") or Faustus (Latin for "auspicious" or "lucky") is the protagonist of a classic German legend who makes a pact with the Devil. The archetypical tale is the basis for many literary, artistic, cinematic, and musical works produced over several hundred years throughout the twentieth century, including those by the likes of Christopher Marlowe, Goethe, Thomas Mann, Hector Berlioz, Franz Liszt, Oscar Wilde and Charles Gounod. Each retelling of the Faust legend builds, in some way, off of the previous versions.
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