Week 7 - Duvivierfv - Golem ASSURREALISTCOMEDY...

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1 Golem  AS SURREALIST COMEDY,  POLITICAL DRAMA AND SOCIALIST ENTERTAINMENT
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metonymy , (from Greek met ō nymia, “change of name,” or  “misnomer”), figure of speech in which the name of an object or concept  is replaced with a word closely related to or suggested by the original, as  “crown” to mean “king” (“The power of the crown was mortally  weakened”) or an author for his works (“I’m studying Shakespeare”). A  familiar Shakespearean example is Mark Antony’s speech in Julius  Caesar in which he asks of his audience: “Lend me your ears.”  http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/378726/metonymy/  Web 18/02/2015 mimesis , basic theoretical principle in the creation of art. The word is  Greek and means “imitation” (though in the sense of “re-presentation”  rather than of “copying”). Plato and Aristotle spoke of mimesis as the re- presentation of nature. According to Plato, all artistic creation is a form of  imitation: that which really exists (in the “world of ideas”) is a type  created by God; the concrete things man perceives in his existence are  shadowy representations of this ideal type. Therefore, the painter, the  tragedian, and the musician are imitators of an imitation, twice removed  from the truth  http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/383233/mimesis / Web 18/02/2015 2
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Wandering Jew, in Christian legend, character doomed to live until the end of the world because he taunted Jesus on the way to the Crucifixion. A reference in John 18:20–22 to an officer who struck Jesus at his arraignment before Annas is sometimes cited as the basis for the legend. The legend was revived in 1602 in a German pamphlet, “Kurze Beschreibung und Erzählung von einem Juden mit namen Ahasverus” (“A Brief Description and Narration Regarding a Jew Named Ahasuerus”). This version, in which the name Ahasuerus is first given to the wanderer, who was not baptized, describes how at Hamburg in 1542 Paulus von Eitzen (d. 1598), a Lutheran bishop of Schleswig, Ger., met an aged Jew who claimed to have taunted Jesus on the way to the Crucifixion. He received the reply “I stand and rest, but you will go on.” The popularity of the pamphlet may have been the result of the anti-Jewish feeling aroused by the belief that the Antichrist would appear in 1600 and be aided by the Jews. The pamphlet was rapidly translated into other languages of Protestant Europe      3
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The golem-beginning with the end of the twelfth century the name appears in a number of texts in the sense of a man-like creature, produced by the magical power of man-starts out as a legendary figure. Then it is transformed into the object of a mystical  ritual of initiation, which seems actually to have been performed,  designed to confirm the adept in his mastery over secret knowledge. 
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