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shortpaper3 - With respect to religion, this would...

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Heather Fackelman December 10, 2007 Great Books and Ideas Professor Chang Greek and Hebrew Philosophy as One The book of John, chapter one, verse one, in the Bible reads as follows: “In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God.” This is quite possibly the most important verse in the entire Bible, as it means that God is everything. God is the transcendent being; He is the cause of everything, yet He, Himself, is uncaused. Ironically, in Greek text, this scripture is changed to the following: “In the beginning was the logos, and the logos was with God, and the logos was God.” This proves that the notion of the trinity is not only a feature of the Hebrew tradition, but also of the Greek tradition. Logos is an essential theme in Greek history, as it goes back the Greek philosopher Heraclitus. He sought to discover what “holds the real substance of the world together.”
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Unformatted text preview: With respect to religion, this would ultimately be God. According to religion, God moves all, creates all, rules all, and causes all. Therefore, logos, the ultimate reason for everything, would be in the beginning, and the reason would be with God, and the reason would be God. This passage changes with the Hebrew tradition, because Greek philosophy is independent of it. Yet, the passage still holds the same, intrinsic meaning. God is the original mover and causer of all. In the beginning of everything would be the cause, and according to Hebraic tradition, that reason would be with God, and the reason would be God. This is no coincidence. This clearly signifies the coming together of Greek philosophy with the Hebraic concept of God. Though this passage from the bible is somewhat different, it has the same meaning, and is indispensable to both Greek and Hebrew tradition and religion....
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This note was uploaded on 02/14/2008 for the course HONP 102 taught by Professor Garrett during the Fall '07 term at Montclair.

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shortpaper3 - With respect to religion, this would...

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