HDF - Test 2 (Review) - TEST 2: REVIEW QUESTIONS Questions...

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TEST 2: REVIEW QUESTIONS Questions given on 3.7.08 Chapter 9 1. Types of singles? 2. Who’s most likely to live alone? 3. When sex ratios are imbalanced, some men (or women) will face a diminished pool of potential mates. Decisions about marriage are often shaped by macro- level phenomena like war, technology, and social movements. 4. 5. Myths bout singles? Several myths about singles exist, including that singles are tied to their mothers’ apron strings; that they are selfish and self-centered; that they are well off financially; that they are happier; and that there is something wrong with people who do not marry. 6. Types of cohabitators? Precursor for Marriage : cohab w/ intent to marry (+ ) certainty of relationship, (+ ) certainty of marriage Substitute for Marriage : cohab instead of marry (+ ) certainty of relationship, (-) certainty of marriage
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Trial Marriage : want to marry but bad at current relationship (-) certainty of relationship, (+ ) certainty of marriage Serious Dating Relationship : happy dating but cohab early in relationship (-) certainty of relationship, (-) certainty of marriage 7. GLBT couples? Gay and lesbian households reflect another alternative lifestyle; just as there is no “typical” lifestyle for heterosexual singles, so there is no one lifestyle typical of homosexuals. There are several variations between the households of gay men and lesbians. Same-sex marriages aren’t officially considered marriages but registered partnerships. Some states, however, have granted gay and lesbian couples certain rights, such as adoption. 8. Defense of Marriage Act in October 1996, which states that no U.S. state or territory has any legal duty to respect a marriage between homosexuals, even if such a marriage is valid in any other state. The Act also bans any form of federal aid to a married couple unless the couple is in “a legal union between one man and one woman as husband and wife.” That would rule out any use in the future by a married homosexual couple of tax or other benefits tied to marriage. Chapter 10 1. Types of marriages? Cuber and Harroff’s Five Types of Marriage Conflict-habituated Devitalized Passive-congenial
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Vital Total Most marriages fall into the first three categories, and they characterized these as utilitarian marriages (based on convenience). The last two types were called intrinsic marriages (inherently rewarding). 2.
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This note was uploaded on 04/15/2008 for the course HDF 304 taught by Professor Gray during the Spring '08 term at University of Texas at Austin.

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HDF - Test 2 (Review) - TEST 2: REVIEW QUESTIONS Questions...

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