Habima's The Golem - Habima's"The Golem Author(s Atay...

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Habima's "The Golem" Author(s): Atay Citron Source: The Drama Review: TDR, Vol. 24, No. 3, Jewish Theatre Issue (Sep., 1980), pp. 59-68 Published by: The MIT Press Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1145309 . Accessed: 06/02/2015 18:48 Your use of the JSTOR archive indicates your acceptance of the Terms & Conditions of Use, available at . http://www.jstor.org/page/info/about/policies/terms.jsp . JSTOR is a not-for-profit service that helps scholars, researchers, and students discover, use, and build upon a wide range of content in a trusted digital archive. We use information technology and tools to increase productivity and facilitate new forms of scholarship. For more information about JSTOR, please contact [email protected] . The MIT Press is collaborating with JSTOR to digitize, preserve and extend access to The Drama Review: TDR. http://www.jstor.org This content downloaded from 142.150.190.39 on Fri, 6 Feb 2015 18:48:12 PM All use subject to JSTOR Terms and Conditions
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Habima's The Golem by Atay Citron After The Dybbuk, The Golem was Habima's most acclaimed production. It opened on March 15, 1925, when Habima was still a studio of the Moscow Art Theatre, and since then it has run for 340 performances on three continents. In 1926, the company toured Europe and the United States, performing The Golem with two other plays. When the company visited Palestine in 1928, the play was revived, and later, in 1948, it was staged in America again. In New York, it was chosen-on the basis of box office demand-as an extra bill for the final week of Habima's season at the Broadway Theatre. In 1954, The Golem represented Israel in the First Inter- national Theatre Festival in Paris. The production excelled in its acting, being a perfect example of the unique expressionistic style that made the Habima players so famous in The Dybbuk. The opening night was also the debut of Aaron Meskin, then a young, inexperienced actor and later was the greatest actor of Habima, Israel's National Theatre. Habima was established in Moscow in 1917. It was a collective group of amateur actors, led by Nahum Zemach and directed by Yevgeni Vakhtangov. Habima produced its Jewish plays in Hebrew, a language unknown to most of its audience, including Jews. But this fact did not interfere with the company's success. It was described by Gorky, Stanislavsky and Vakhtangov as one of Moscow's most prominent theatres. In 1925, however, the company had to face the difficult challenge of choosing a repertoire. In accordance with their Zionist goals, the members wanted to produce a very specific kind of repertoire-plays about Jewish history, Jewish heroism or Jewish contemporary life. Such plays were rare, especially in Hebrew. When a mem- ber of the play committee brought in The Golem, the whole company hastened to gather for the first reading.
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