Physics Notes 09-12-07

Physics Notes 09-12-07 - Physics Notes 9-12-07 Review of...

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Physics Notes 9-12-07 Review of Newton’s Law’s(see notes from 9/10/07) -Gravity is an attractive force between any two “massive” objects -For an object in free fall, one object is the earth and the other is the falling object. -Why do objects of a different mass fall at the same rate? Galileo’s argument: Gravity pulls harder on objects with more mass; however, objects with more mass have more inertia. These two factors cancel out to arrive at a mass-independent rate of acceleration. In general, the magnitude of gravitational force is: F sub g = (G)(mass 1)(mass 2) R^2 Where G = 6.674 x 10^-11 Nm^2/kg^2, m1 and m2 are the masses of the two objects, and r is the distance between their centers. -Since F sub y = (m sub 1)(a sub y) = - ((G)(m1)(msub E))/((R sub E + y(t))^2) where R sub E is the radius of the earth, m1 the mass of the falling object, cancels out s. t. A sub y=(G sub mE)/ ((R sub E + y(t))^2) = -(G sub mE)/R^2 sub E. What is the value of A sub y?
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This note was uploaded on 04/15/2008 for the course PHY 101 taught by Professor Schwarz during the Spring '08 term at Syracuse.

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Physics Notes 09-12-07 - Physics Notes 9-12-07 Review of...

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