Eating Local Products-Annotated bibliography Draft 1 - Rhet 110 Eating Local Products An Annotated Bibliography Bittman Mark Is Junk Food Really Cheaper

Eating Local Products-Annotated bibliography Draft 1 - Rhet...

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Unformatted text preview: Rhet 110 Eating Local Products: An Annotated Bibliography Bittman, Mark. Is Junk Food Really Cheaper?. Boston: Bedford St. Martins, 2013. Print. In his article, “Is Junk Food Really Cheaper?,” Mark Bittman discusses the average price and health value of a fast food meal versus a home cooked one. It would appear to the average American that a fast food meal is less expensive than one cooked in their own home. Despite this belief, it is actually more of a bargain to cook a meal than to buy one for a family of four from a place like McDonalds. The common four-­‐person family will spend twenty-­‐four dollars on a McDonalds meal while they could spend just nine on a healthier home cooked meal. The issue at hand is that after working one or two jobs everyday, coming home to cook a meal is often a chore and not the joy it often used to be. Mark Bittman has a valid belief. At this time, most people are not willing to come home and cook a meal. It is apparent that many families would rather go to Fast food using the excuse that it is cheaper when in reality it is not the cheaper choice, when truly they’re just lazy. Before the article, it is pointed out that Bittman may not be a credible source because he is neither an expert in this subject nor a journalist. But, he has a valid point and has the right to an opinion. Because he did do research on this topic, it is likely that he is a reliable source. Black, Jane. "Can Local Food Jumpstart the Economy?" Community Food Enterprise. N.p., 2009. Web. 26 Sept. 2013. According the article “Can Local Food Jumpstart the Economy?” by Jane Black, buying locally grown produce can have a positive impact on society. Local producers have made a real business out of their products, if people stop consuming their products, the society declines. This article talks about a market, Weaver Market, which has found a way to distribute local produce at a better cost. If one buys enough of their product then he or she can get discounts in the future. This business model is a good idea because it helps the local economy. Giving a community a convenient way to buy local produce is the only way to go about providing it. This is because the way our society is set up. If the food needs to be transported a long way, there is a large environmental impact; there is also one if the transport is in many small deliveries. Either way, the impact has a downfall. If there is a centralized market that sells local produce, there is the best of both worlds. Boggs, Lacy. "The Real Cost of Eating Like A Locavore." Whole Living Daily: Whole Living. N.p., 10 Sept. 2012. Web. 26 Sept. 2013 This article, “The Real Cost of Eating Like a Locavore,” by Lucy Boggs, shows a way it is possible to be a locavore while staying on a family budget. While it is incredibly difficult for a family to afford being locavores, Boggs suggests numerous tips in order to complete the task. Also, she discusses her opinion about why eating locally is better. There is no way to be sure what research she has done, but she says she thinks it is better to eat locally. Many of her tips could be helpful to a person trying to become a locavore on a budget like shopping at farmers markets where it is wholesale. She is right that there are ways around breaking one’s budget, but it is still incredibly difficult. Lucy Boggs could be onto something in that she has found ways to slowly being the process of becoming a locavore. It is not really something that can happen overnight. Her stance on becoming one is smart because she is supporting the local community without doing a complete transfer, which has been known to cause problems. She is not necessarily entirely reliable, but she never said she was supposed to be, she is just offering a way to begin to eat locally. Desrochers, Pierre. "The Locavores' Delusion: Truer Advertising for the Local Food Debate." Fair Observer. N.p., 21 Sept. 2013. Web. 26 Sept. 2013. Pierre Desrochers’, “The Locavores' Delusion: Truer Advertising for the Local Food Debate” is an article based on his opinion of how societies should get its food. He comments on the five main myths about locavorism. His social, economic, environmental, security, and taste and health reasons are described. Desrochers really believes that being a locavore is a bad thing because throughout history the world has accomplished so much through trade with other countries and it hasn’t been a problem before. He really believes that the current system is not globalized enough, and that if local foods are consumed at all it would probably hurt the economy. Desrochers’ view is very extreme. If only globalized food was to be consumed, then the local economies would go out of business. Everything in moderation is the best way to go. Global products should be used if they cannot be grown locally, and vise versa, then the entire economic system would be used to its advantage. There is no way to have a functioning society without both the local and global markets operating, so both should be supported. Ironside, Claire. Making a visual Argument: Apples to Oranges. Boston: Bedford St. Martins, 2013. Print. Claire Ironside makes an argument about local food through art and design in “Making a visual Argument: Apples to Oranges.” Ironside makes it clear through her pictures that buying food from far away is just not environmentally worth it. According to the article it takes food over two thousand kilometers to reach the average human’s plate. So why not buy locally? She makes the argument about the distance that products travel; the difference between traveling within a country and between two countries is drastic. Ironside’s opinion presented through art illustrates that it is very difficult and environmentally hazardous to ship food a long way, instead of the simple alternative to buy local food. This article was easy to read. Although there are many articles that have the same effect, the way this one was portrayed made each concept very simple. The very clean-­‐cut images were ones that depicted information in a simplistic manner. Pelletier, Christophe. The Locavore’s Dilemma. The Food Futurist. December 2010. Web. In the article “The Locavore’s Dilemma” by Christophe Pelletier, the author discusses whether or not living a locavore lifestyle is even possible. A locavore is a person who consumes only products that can be found within a one hundred mile radius of where he or she lives. This article mentions many drawbacks of living this way. One disadvantage is that farmers who farm in a relatively unpopulated area would not have enough people to sell his or her products to and would quickly go out of business. Although it sounds logical, moving food from place to place is very difficult on a farmer’s budget; this is because the cost of driving one large, fully loaded truck to one place is less costly than a small one stopping at many destinations. According to the article, it has almost no advantages; the one that exists is that locally grown produce is better for small local farmers, if people can afford to buy it. Overall, being a locavore is a good idea in theory, but it would harm the economy as whole. Even though the idea of being a locavore is a good one, it really isn’t because the entire world would be deeply impacted. The entire economy could be thrown off if one country stops importing foreign products. Although Pelletier is writing this as a blog, it still has numerous valid and reliable points, as he owns a consulting firm regarding aspects of food production. Every part of the world has its own climate and other factors regarding what food can be grown in certain areas. Some places can only grow chocolate or coffee, while some can raise livestock. If every source is not mixed, it might detract from the nutritious diets that people rely on for survival. This article points out that being a locavore might be bad for everyone in the long run. Peterson, Gregory. "Is Eating Locally A Moral Obligation?." Journal Of Agricultural & Environmental Ethics 26.2 (2013): 421-­‐437. Environment Complete. Web. 30 Sept. 2013. In “Is Eating Locally A Moral Obligation?,” author Gregory Peterson examine how to eat locally and what it means. He argues for eating locally and says how much it has grown in recent years. While many believe that eating locally is not a possibility, Peterson truly believes in it and says that in the end, the better way to eat is locally. This article was not easy to read. The authors organization and constant quoting and paraphrasing from other sources made it hard to follow. Whether or not the information was his was never clear and this made it hard to understand what he was trying to get across to the reader. “The Pros and Cons of Becoming a Locavore." Page River Bottom Farm. N.p., 2012. Web. 26 Sept. 2013. Web. The article, “The Pros and Cons of Becoming a Locavore,” is a very simplistic way of portraying a heavily opinionated topic. Whether or not one wants to become a locavore is very different than whether or not one should. This article is written by a farmer that specializes in local, non-­processed foods that are sold at local stores and farmers markets. The authors do give a good perspective though as they truly know what it means to be a locavore and know what it takes. Being a locavore, though it is a good idea, is slightly undoable. It would be great to support local economies, but in reality not every society has the space or climate to grow crops for themselves. It is practical to do what he or she can to support small business owners, but it is not entirely practical for all people; not everyone lives in an area that can have local food within a certain distance. Wikipedia. Farm-­‐to-­‐Table. Boston: Bedford St. Martins, 2013. Web. Wikipedia’s “Farm-­‐To-­‐Table” comments on the process of food production. This movement refers to growing local food and delivering it directly to local consumers. Communities of people such as restaurants, agriculturists, and food service people support this movement. Arguments against food from far places are such that they are tasteless and not fresh. These arguments are very valid and help support the local food movement. There is now a separation of chefs in the culinary world as some use local ingredients and others use ones from afar. Farm-­‐to-­‐table chefs tend to have better tasting, more environmentally friendly food. In many areas local and family farms will sells its agriculture products outside the farm and they’re open for everyone to order and purchase. Also, there are many farm stands around where you can pick up fresh fruit and vegetables. If our society bought our produce in this manner everywhere, money could be saved and the economy could grow because the money would be localized. If the effort is made use more farm-­‐to-­‐table services, the economy could benefit greatly, even though not all products can be bought in this manner. Wikipedia. Local Food. Boston: Bedford St. Martins, 2013. Web. In “Local Food,” by Wikipedia, the local food movement is discussed at length. Enhancing the social, environmental, and economic aspects of any society is within the interests of the local food movement. Buying locally grown goods is a better decision in most situations because not only does it help the economy of ones community but the environment as well. There are numerous definitions of local, but most of them involve the geographical position of where a community is. Local foods are not only found at farmers markets, they can also be found in many school and supermarkets. Buying local groceries can help promote not only our economy, but our environment as well. In theory, eating local food is the best idea for the economy. If everyone just ate what was readily available within a certain distance to him or her, then every economy could potentially be flourishing. The issue in that theory though is that the world has adapted in a way that it cannot live with certain things that are not grown around us, for example chocolate and coffee. Because there are specific products like these that the world depends on, these products cannot just be cut off. This problem is very relevant because even though people should be eating locally and growing his or her own food, each person cannot cultivate many products that he or she is used to having normally. Wollan, Malia. Migration, on ice: How Globalization Kills Chickens for Their Parts. Print. In her article, “Migration, on ice: How Globalization Kills Chickens for Their Parts” Malia Wollan comments on how chickens are manufactured around the world. The meat packing company Tyson sells different meats all over the world, but their largest product is chicken. Poultry has become the most easily abundant and accessible bird in the world. The pros of this are that third-­‐world countries can access a very cheap source of protein in a simple manner and maintain the nutrition they need. The downside is that the United States has taken over the poultry industry, and is ruining the local poultry farmer’s chance of making profit. This has been done because chicken are so mass-­‐produced that they have become very inexpensive to feed and store. Even though Ghana’s poultry farming business was at one time a large business, most of the chicken in restaurants in Ghana comes from Tyson, as it is cheaper than local chicken. The fact that a local chicken slaughtered down the road some ways is more expensive than a chicken that has traveled half way across the world is disheartening. Most people would like to believe that every country has the decency to help other economies along with its own, but this article really says the opposite. Ghana’s chicken factory is tied to Tyson so chicken remains cheap; the freshly slaughtered chicken industry in Ghana makes chicken too expensive for the average local to afford. Although globalization can be a good thing in certain ways, destroying one person’s livelihood for more money as a rich American is ruthless. ...
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