GE 466 - critical value of t for p=.05 The likelihood is...

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Brandon Moczygemba GE 466 GE 466 1. The null hypothesis is that for the association between the # of hours respondents said they worked in a week and the # of hours they said they watched TV, Pearson’s r would be expected to =0. There is no association between the # of hours worked and the #s of hours spent watching TV. At -.148, Pearson’s r is a fairly weak negative association. The more hours the respondents said they worked in a week, the less the # of hours they reported watching TV. An r-squared of .02 indicates that only 2% of the variation in hours spent watching TV can be accounted for by differences in the # of hours worked in a week. Even though the relationship is weak, the statistic of -2.63 at 308 degrees of freedom exceeds the critical value of t at the .05 level. 3. The observed value of t at 939 degrees of freedom exceeds the
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Unformatted text preview: critical value of t for p=.05. The likelihood is remote that a t of this magnitude with 939 degrees of freedom could be found by chance in a sample drawn from a population with a specified population mean of 40. Consequently, we reject the null hypothesis that the sample came from a population with the specified population mean. 5. The obtained t statistic of 3.92 with 956 degrees of freedom exceeds the critical value of t of 1.960. Consequently, it is not likely that the association between hours spent watching TV and sex is due to chance. It is more likely the result of an actual association between the # of hours spent watching TV and sex in the population. The null hypothesis, that there is no association between these 2 variables is rejected....
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This note was uploaded on 04/15/2008 for the course CJ Stats taught by Professor Dietz during the Spring '08 term at Texas State.

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