Suvin - Estrangement and Cognition

Suvin - Estrangement and Cognition - In keeping with...

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In keeping with section 29 of the Canadian Copyright Act, fair dealing allows you to make one copy. This copy must be used solely for research, private study, criticism, review or news reporting. CI NCE ICTI On the Poetics and History of a Literary Genre Darko Suvin New Haven and London Yale University Press
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To friends and comrades from Science-Fiction Studies Marc, Fred, Ursula, Dale, Patrick, Bob, and Don: they helped. Copyright © 1979 by Yale University. All rights reserved. This book may not be reproduced, in whole or in part, in any form (beyond that copying permitted by Sections 107 and 108 of the U.S. Copyright Law and except by reviewers for the public press), without written permission from the publishers. Second printing, 1980. Printed in the United States of America by The Murray Printing Company, Westford, Massachusetts. Published in Great Britain, Europe, Africa, and Asia (except Japan) by Yale University Press, Ltd., London. Distributed in Australia and New Zealand by Book & Film Services, Artarmon, N.S.W., Australia; and in Japan by Harper & Row, Publishers, Tokyo Office. Library of Congress Cataloging in Publication Data Suvin, Darko, 1930- Metamorphoses of science fiction. Bibliography Includes index. 1. Science fiction-History and criticism. I. Title. PN3448.S45S897 809.3'876 78-6265 ISBN 0-300-02250-6 (cloth). ISBN 0-300-02375-8 (paper)
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In keeping with section 29 of the Canadian Copyright Act, fair dealing allows you to make one copy. This copy must be used solely for research, private study, criticism, review or news reporting. 1 Estrangement and Cognition 1. SCIENCE FICTION As FICTION (ESTRANGEMENT) 1.1. The importance of science fiction (SF) in our time is on the increase. First, there are strong indications that its popularity in the leading industrial nations (United States, USSR, United Kingdom, Japan) has risen sharply over the last 100 years, de- spite all the local and short-range fluctuations. SF has particu- larly affected such key strata or groups of modern society as college graduates, young writers, and the avant-garde of general readers appreciative of new sets of values. This is a significant cultural effect which goes beyond any merely quantitative cen- sus. Second, if one takes the minimal generic difference of SF the presence of a narrative novum (the dramatis personae and/or their context) significantly different from what is the norm in "naturalistic" or empiricist fiction, it will be found that SF has an interesting and close kinship with other literary sub- genres that flourished at different times and places of literary history: the classical and medieval "fortunate island" story, the "fabulous voyage" story from antiquity on, the Renaissance and Baroque "utopia" and "planetary novel," the Enlightenment "state [political] novel," the modern "anticipation" and "anti- utopia." Moreover, although SF shares with myth, fantasy, fairy tale, and pastoral an opposition to naturalistic or empiricist liter- The first version of this essay emerged from a lecture given in Spring 1968 in J.
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