kant2 - John Bowen Test 2: Kant November 2, 2007 Philosophy...

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John Bowen Test 2: Kant November 2, 2007 Philosophy 100 Dr . Robert Sharp Lessons from Kant: on adultery Throughout the course of time, humans have tried to find stones in sand . In an ever changing world where the sands of time are forever shifting, philosophers such as Immanuel Kant have tried to find hard rocks of truth about how to live our lives . While others relied on religious texts such as the Bible and Koran, Kant tried to figure it out using something completely different: his rationale . Kant believed in acting moral . Acting moral, he thought, was the only true way to be free . He believed we had the autonomous free will; that we, as humans, could only be truly free if we gave ourselves guidelines and behaviors in which to act(9) . Our conscious self is what separated us from animals, whereas animals act only according to their desires, we could, he said, act according to our will and do what was best . Moral action makes us free, while acting immorally does nothing but make us animalistic in nature(8) . His strict belief in rational left no room for gray . In Kant’s world, it seemed, things were only black and white, good or bad . And we had a perfect duty to always do
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This note was uploaded on 04/15/2008 for the course PHL 100 taught by Professor Sharp during the Spring '07 term at Alabama.

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kant2 - John Bowen Test 2: Kant November 2, 2007 Philosophy...

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