SOC 101- Lecture 20

SOC 101- Lecture 20 - • Standard indicators of academic...

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Lecture 20 Higher Education Outline of Lecture How are admission decisions made? Is there a trade-off btw merit and diversity? What are the consequences of diversity preferences in college admissions? Mitchell Stevens’ Creating a Class Coarse Sorts vs Fine Distinctions Coarse sorts: require relatively small amounts of information; relatively mechanical selection procedure Fine distinctions: require lots of information; harder to standardize Evaluate Storytelling The process of translating attributes into identities A collaborative endeavor: many sources of “raw narrative material” to be interpreted and assembled Unequal distribution of story-telling resources Creating a Class Bottom-line concerns o Academic quality of entering class overall o Financial aid budget Diversity o Academic interests o Geographic (international and regional) o Racial/ethnic o Gender? Special considerations o Legacies o Athletes o Racial/ethnic minorities Alon and Tienda
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Unformatted text preview: • Standard indicators of academic merit: SAT scores and grades/class rank • Ability to predict academic success? • “test-based” vs. “performance-based” indicators • More selective schools place more weight on SAT scores than class rank; this difference has increased over time • Because black and Hispanic students have lower average SAT scores, selective schools must boost the admissions rates for these students in order to achieve desired diversity • The process pits ideals of merit against diversity Shifting Meritocracy • Defintions of merit shift over time • Using class rank rather than test scores to evaluate students increases the pool of qualified minority students Texas “Ten Percent” Plan • Guarantees admission to UT-Austin for all Texas high school graduates in the top 10% of their class • Consequences for diversity? • Consequences for college completion?...
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