Comparing monsters draft (eng) - Clark 1 Tyler Clark P...

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Clark 1 Tyler Clark P. Flory-Sanchez Eng. 98 3331 4pm 7 March 2015 Not all Monsters are Hideous: by Tyler Clark From the grainy composition of a photo, to the ghoulish-features that construct the faces upon them; we will be looking at the elements that constitute, and create a “Monster”. The composition of a photo is a major component to the overall experience. In an instant; it invites the viewer to either seek embracement within the fortified walls of a Polaroid, or to be rejected; and cast off to the side as waste, like the man named Peter Wilkins in D.S. Neff’s “ Invisible Hands ”. When viewing a portrait, regardless of who it is, one must view it in the eyes of an artist. Be subjective; view the photo as a whole and try to pull the emotions and feelings of the picture. Composition and saturation is the first element we are introduced to when viewing the portraits of the two contradicting monsters. Both photos are black and white, slightly saturated, and to an extent over exposed. In the case of Richard Wagner’s portrait the photo is highly over exposed and when taking a closer inspection, it almost seems like his skin had been tampered with. The black and white nature of the photos, pull in the viewers with an alluring sense of nostalgia. Like finding and ancient relic, it sparks an interest with one’s past, and invites the viewer to dig deeper into their own history. Accordingly, the composition and saturation of the two monster’s faces add to their freakish appearance, from Wagner’s wandering eye, to Frankenstein’s behemoth-sized forehead. Moving from the composition of the photos, we begin to view the atrocity called Frankenstein. While viewing this creature, emotions of fear, and disgust, can engulf ones inner- being, while simultaneously, in a subconscious fashion, engrain the viewer with an intriguing
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