Darfur Paper - The art exhibit "Refugees from...

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The art exhibit “Refugees from Darfur” by Caesar Ricci and Victoria Smith was a grave and introspective experience. Throughout the exhibit I was forced to confront, face to face, the genocide in Darfur. Many of the photographs were very graphic and captured the essence of the everyday struggle to live. The first photograph that grabbed and held my attention was “Abdulrahman’s Journey.” In this striking representation of a family’s struggle, five individuals are depicted in the bed of an old rusty, white pick-up truck. The father is seated the furthest back, to the left, and has on a white turban and a full length khaki robe with a blue hued undershirt. He looks frail and malnourished. You are able to see his highly defined cheekbones, and his skin practically hangs on his face. His hair is in the latter stages of graying. He looks to be around fifty, but he may look older than he actually is because of the lack of food and water. He has deeply etched worry lines around his eyes and mouth.
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This essay was uploaded on 04/15/2008 for the course EN 1311 taught by Professor Delgado during the Fall '07 term at Saint Mary's University Texas.

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