S321_StudyGuide_SocialClassDifferences_SexualPatterns_MinoritiesOfSexAndGender - Study Guide LAST OF PART II CULTURE SOCIAL STRUCTURE AND SEXUALITY

S321_StudyGuide_SocialClassDifferences_SexualPatterns_MinoritiesOfSexAndGender

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Study Guide LAST OF PART II: CULTURE, SOCIAL STRUCTURE, AND SEXUALITY Lecture: Social Class Differences Open-ended Question— Know the answer I provide in my lecture outline to the question on how the study of social class and sex relates to sociology. How does the study of social class and sex relate to sociology? (1) It is difficult to conceive of a country as a single culture. It is more accurate to conceive of it as a multiplicity of cultures. (2) These diverse cultures are formed by the intersection of many sociological characteristics (3) This is exemplified in this lecture’s examination of the differences that appear in the average heterosexual profiles of different educational classes. Seeing this as a cultural difference means that when you are a member of one educational class you may learn from others in your class (or be influenced in other ways by factors associated with your education) to think, feel, and behave in a certain way with regard to sexuality. (4) Other sociological characteristics intersect with social class. This lecture examines this in looking at the intersection of generation, gender, and social class . Thus, in separately comparing men and women of different generations within the different educational classes, one can get a better sense of how the historical period one grows up in can combine with gender and social class in shaping one's sexuality. Specific Questions: What were the social class differences in sexual patterns among men in the 1940s and, then, in 1970? What were the social class differences in sexual patterns among women in the 1940s and, then, in 1970? How does Kinsey = s view of female sexuality differ from Weinberg = s as evidenced by their different explanation of the sexual patterns of women in the 1940s? What effect did one = s family social class background have on the sexual patterns of IU students? Lower educated (men 1940) – don’t masturbate, no hand jobs/fingering (higher education do though), more like to perform/receive oral sex? More likely to lose virginity at younger age and had more partners. Women 1940 – non-coital behaviors, age lost virginity, and number of partners-NO class difference. 1970 – no class difference in non-coital behaviors and total number of coital partners. Less education more likely to be doing more of: Light petting, heavy petting, coitus (14-17) Positive experiences: FIRST Masturbation 40% HS, Some college 44%, college 73% Masturbate for men 19% HS, some college 46%, and college 51% FIRST COITUS 33% HS, 58% SC, C63% Sexual patterns of IU students:
-Less educated – more negative attitude towards nudity -Family without college education – much more negative toward this pattern. Less likely to receive hand jobs/manual sex. First sexual intercourse – younger. Larger number of coital partners (than men that come from higher education) Women – parallel with regards to nudity. Masturbating men, less likely to come from lower education, also less likely to do non coital acts (but more likely to engage in sex younger) I. Kinsey et al.: Men -- 1940s A.

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