Final Exam Study Guide - POEMS AFTER THE MIDTERM The Bear...

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POEMS AFTER THE MIDTERM:The Bear,” Galway Kinnell,the rest of my days I spend/wandering: wondering/what, anyway,/was that stickyinfusion, that rank flavor of blood, that poetry, by which I lived?” Fragment,” C.K. Williams,“crying, "God, God," in that voice I was always afraid existed within us, the voice that knows/beyond illusion the irrevocability of death, beyond any dream of being not mortally injured--”Strange Fruit,” Joy HarjoI didn't do anything wrong. I did not steal from your mother. My brother did not take your wife. I did not break into your home, tell you how to live or die. Please. Go away, hooded ghosts from hell on earth”Shush, we have too many stories to carry on our backs like houses, we have/struggled too long to let the monsters steal our sleep, sleep, go to sleep.”prose poem?Poems Dealing with the Natural World:The Fish” (960) Elizabeth BishopDiscursive languageA lot of turning points within the poemcan be seen as an Ode
Imagery.“I looked into his eyes which were far larger than mine but shallower, and yellowed,the irises backed and packed with tarnished tinfoil seen through the lensesof old scratched isinglass.”The Geese,” Jorie Graham“Yet the small fear of the spiders binds and binds the pins to the lines, the lines to the eaves, to the pincushion bush,”Design,” (805) Robert Frost,found a dimpled spider, fat and white, On a white heal-all, holding up a moth Like a white piece of rigid satin cloth --”Petrarchan sonnetThe Snow Man,” (816) Wallace Stevens,“For the listener, who listens in the snow, And, nothing himself, beholds Nothing that is not there and the nothing that is.”“When I Heard the Learn’d Astronomer,” (689) Walt Whitman“In a Station of the Metro,” (846) Ezra Pound“The apparition of these faces in the crowd;/ Petals on a wet, black bough.”“Miracle Glass Co.,” Charles Simic “this street with its pink sky,Row of gray tenements,A lone dog,
Children on rollerskates,Woman buying flowers,Someone looking lost.” Can be seen as an ode“Sad Steps,” (1032) Phillip Larkincompares growing old to the moon“Groping back to bed after a pissI part thick curtains, and am startled by The rapid clouds, the moon’s cleanliness.”“The Trees,” (1031) Phillip Larkin,can be seen as an Ode Is it that they are born again And we grow old? No, they die too.The Apple Trees at Olema,” Robert Hassfree verse “Blue-eyes, poppies, a scattering of lupineflecked the meadow, and an intricate, leopard-spottedleaf-green flower whose name they didn’t know.Trout lily, he said; she said, adder’s-tongue.”Tennessee June,” Jorie Graham,“A Blessing,” James Wrightvery in the moment contemplative writingobsessed with ponies
“And the eyes of those two Indian ponies/ Darken with kindness.”“Suddenly I realize That if I stepped out of my body I would break Into blossom.”

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